The End of American Jewish Literature, Again

What role does America play in Jewish life, and by extension what kind of Jewish literature can be created here?

David Bezmozgis’ Brilliant Alt-History of an Adulterous Sharansky Who Never Was

New novel ‘The Betrayers’ boldly places at its center the most famous refusenik and all he represents for Soviet Jewry

‘Leonard Bernstein: An American Musician,’ by Allen Shawn

In an excerpt from a new biography, the great showman asks, ‘What does music mean?’

Leonard Bernstein: A New Look at His Rise, His Foibles, and His Impact on Music History

The dynamic conductor and genius behind ‘West Side Story’ also wrote classical works. Allen Shawn explores what they reveal.

Reliving Tragedy Was My Job at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum

How under the weight of history, all memory becomes holy—even the memory that should not

Johnny Cash in the Holy Land

The country singer—and a founding father of American Christian Zionism—died 11 years ago this week

‘David: The Divided Heart,’ by David Wolpe

An excerpt from a new analysis of King David, the biblical poet-hero

A Most Unlikable Woman

An aging feminist meets a new generation in Brian Morton’s sharp, sympathetic novel ‘Florence Gordon’

Stefan Zweig’s Illusion of a Good Europe That Never Was Bewitches Us Still

The Austrian writer presented an ideal of what Europe might have been and might one day be

LARP-ing at the Crematorium (in a Suburban Hyatt Hotel)

A live-action role-playing game set up a scenario with ‘inmates’ and a ‘furnace.’ What could go wrong?

Israel’s First Burning Man, One Mile From Ben Gurion’s Grave

From Black Rock City to the Negev Desert, the sandy camping trip comes to the Middle East

The Freudian Became a Catholic

Karl Stern, Canadian psychiatrist and writer, was in his day a famous Catholic convert. Why has he been forgotten?

Israeli Comedy Scores Points by Bringing Together Soccer and Gay Politics

In the movie ‘Kicking Out Shoshana,’ a popular athlete pretends to be gay. The result is both funny and surprisingly meaningful.

A Photographer in the City: Garry Winogrand’s New Metropolitan Ironies

The Met’s dazzling retrospective declares: ‘It’s all a matter of how much freedom you can stand.’

Wicked Sons: Benjamin Kerstein, Doron Rabinovici, and Norman Finkelstein

Is Jewish rebellion really a form of submission? Two new novels and one political critic examine apostasy.

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