J. Hoberman

J. Hoberman, the former longtime Village Voice film critic, is a monthly film columnist for Tablet Magazine. His new book, Film After Film: Or, What Became of 21st Century Cinema? was recently published by Verso.

Darren Aronofsky’s ‘Noah’ Is a Hot, Wet, Cinematic Mess

It rains and rains in the most eccentric Old Testament adaptation, and most Jewish biblical blockbuster, ever made

‘The Last of the Unjust,’ the New Film by the Director of ‘Shoah,’ Is a Moral and Aesthetic Blunder

Claude Lanzmann returns to his greatest subject through footage of a conflicted Elder of Theresienstadt

Coen Bros. Torture Another Schlemiel While Imagining They Are Dylan’s True Heirs

‘Inside Llewyn Davis,’ opening December 6, pits the existential victim against the very possibility of Jewish success

Living the Nightmare of Mass Murder in Oscar-Nominated Doc The Act of Killing

Joshua Oppenheimer’s brutal film about the Indonesian genocide shows us what history looks like when blood-soaked sociopaths win

Hannah Arendt, Guilty Pleasure

Thrill to the Jewish Philosopher Queen as she does battle with boring Nazis, The New Yorker, and Mossad

The Shining Is About What?

Room 237 uses Talmudic exegesis to uncover whether Kubrick’s film is about Indians, the Holocaust, or bears

The Jewish Brando

John Garfield, the tough, underrated Hollywood star who would have turned 100 today, embodied Jewish pride

Gems From New York’s Film Fest

A live-score screening of the Yiddish classic The Yellow Ticket helps launch the city’s Jewish cinema celebration

A Jewy Little Christmas

Three comedies—This Is 40, Parental Guidance, and The Guilt Trip—give the holidays cheap laughs

Avraham Lincoln Avinu

Spielberg’s timely new Civil War biopic portrays a man leading his people to the gates of the Promised Land

A Filmmaker’s Shock and Awe

Russian-born Julia Loktev’s haunting new The Loneliest Planet sends beautiful youth into the wilderness

Schlocky Horror Picture Show

The Possession, starring Matisyahu, fails to live up to the potential of Jewish horror films

Wallace Markfield, Contender

The novelist and film critic was the most gifted also-ran of the 1960s Jewish-American literary renaissance

Solondz’s Schlubs

The funny, sad Dark Horse adds a creepy loser in love to the director’s catalog of misanthropes

The Not-So-Great ‘Dictator’

In his Arab-despot farce, Sacha Baron Cohen tries too hard to get under the skin of Arabs, Jews, and Americans

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