Jeremy Sigler is a poet living in Brooklyn. He is co-editor of Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010 published by Yale University Press and Dia Art Foundation.
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What Made Alex Katz So Brand New & Terrific?

The painter’s early 1950s work is the subject of an exceptional, worth-the-detour new show in Maine

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Artists Don’t Have To Be ‘For’ or ‘Against’ Something. They Can Just Make the Thing They Have to Make.

The superhero genius of Peter Saul and Jim Nutt, according to curator Dan Nadel

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Jewfro Visits Huck and Jim at the Whitney

A naked African-American, life-like young boys, personal property, public art, commerce, and cultural bravery collide at the nexus of the new West Side scene

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Watching

A poem for Baltimore

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Laurie Simmons’ Doll Girls at the Jewish Museum: A Dialogue With Jeremy Sigler

The artist on Jewish mothers, ‘1950s American’ dummies, childhood superheroes, phallic red lipstick, and Japanese sex toys

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Balthus’ Soft-Core Polaroids Splash Down in Paris

An exhibit that is a violation of a young girl’s and a dead artist’s privacy. Or not.

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Adam at the Met

The museum miraculously puts a broken god back together again

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Frederick Wiseman’s Cosmic Joke

The Old Master of documentary film talks about tantrums at London’s National Gallery, his curiosity, and his love of janitors

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Powerless in the Face of Beauty: Helena Rubinstein at the Jewish Museum

A new exhibit about the cosmetics queen shows at what cost she taught women to power their way through beauty’s slow fade

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Egon Schiele, Billionaire Ron Lauder’s Boyhood Version of Jimmy Page, Live at the Neue Galerie

A New York show delivers an early incarnation of the hunger artist, fascinated with the malleability of his own body

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The Darker, More Disturbing Side of Artist Jeff Koons’ Love Affair With Kitsch

Art-world pervert flaunts mirrored balloons, oodles of cash at the Whitney

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‘Other Primary Structures’ at the Jewish Museum, Curated by Jens Hoffmann!

The art institution revisits and reenacts (sort of) a hit 1966 Minimalist and Conceptualist show—but why?