Liel Leibovitz

Liel Leibovitz is a senior writer for Tablet Magazine.

Left For Dead

The Israeli left has collapsed in the last decade. But the right, despite its successes, is dying, too, brought down by Russian-imported maximalism and American-imported political consultants.

Israel’s Housing Crisis, Rooted in the Settlements

Not that you’d know it from the anti-‘politics’ protesters

No Harm

The government should follow Moses’ example and drop its prosecution of hacker Aaron Swartz, who downloaded millions of academic articles but broke no discernible law

Our Heroes

What if movie superheroes—Thor, Wolverine, The Fantastic Four, and Captain America—got in touch with their Jewish roots?

Pit Stop

For kids growing up in Israel in the 1970s and 1980s, before cable TV and video games, summer meant apricots and the apricot-pit game called gogoim, mindless child’s play with political overtones

How Hamas Busted My Ingenious Scheme

It is game over for me and Shin Bet

No, the Anti-Boycott Law Really Isn’t OK

Some responses to your objections

Dolled Up

An exhibit in Tel Aviv surveys the changes in Israeli history, and the nation’s self-perception, through the once-popular medium of decorative dolls

Office Politics

This week’s parasha is proof that even God changes his mind. Congress must do the same and finally pass legislation prohibiting workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation.

The Voice

Before he was the famous voice of Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, and Woody Woodpecker, Mel Blanc was a Jewish kid in Portland, Ore., doing impressions of his immigrant neighbors

Gaming The System

Israeli students design old-school video game to protest ultra-Orthodox benefits

Unruly

The anti-boycott bill that passed the Knesset yesterday—which makes it illegal to call for severed economic ties with Israel or its West Bank settlements—is a reprehensible criminalization of dissent

Talking Asses

The misguided prophet Balaam—who knew that words have meanings and must be used judiciously—should be the patron saint of the Internet

Tree of Strife

Terrence Malick’s new film—a cinematic meditation on God, grace, and the wretchedness of man—is an important and masterful work of art. It’s also the least Jewish film ever made.

Undead

Forget those sexy vampires and shirtless werewolves. Only zombies represent the Torah’s true teachings on life and death, reminding us that death is just a part of life.

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