Liel Leibovitz

Liel Leibovitz is a senior writer for Tablet Magazine.

Out of Tune

When Israelis and Palestinians choose politics over music, they’re guilty of the gravest offense in the Torah: acting like Amalek

Israeli Soldiers Barred from Turkey Match

IDF orders Maccabi Tel Aviv players not to travel to hostile land

Why Doesn’t Euroleague Recognize Tel Aviv?

A basketball video game refers to ‘Maccabi Electra’

The Non-Belonger

Alfred Kazin brought out the Jew in Emerson, the mystic in sex, and the terrible beauty in community. There’s no better guide for the “social me” age.

Ice and Fire

Moses, the father of a radically egalitarian legal system, would have dug the soft financial revolution taking place in Iceland

Exegesis

Jeanette Ingberman—the co-founder of New York’s Exit Art gallery, who died last week—brought a Talmudic sensibility to avant-garde art

Curses

The Torah and the recent hit children’s book Go the F**k to Sleep both stress the importance of being aware not only of kind words but of damning ones as well

An Israeli Ode to Gadaffi

Putative relative of Libyan leader bemoans his downfall (in verse)

Lonesome Dove

Barack Obama isn’t to blame for the Tea Party’s surge. Liberals are. And if they want him to win re-election in 2012, they better listen to Moses and learn how to take initiative.

Scandal Sweeps Israel’s ‘American Idol’

Judge accused of competition-rigging. Really??

Israel’s ‘American Idol’ Reveals Larger Moral Rot

Alleged criminal ties sully popular show, boost protest movement

Another Exodus

As told in this week’s parasha, Moses couldn’t enter the Promised Land. My three brothers, the subjects of my latest documentary film, chose to leave it.

Political Class

Activists—from the youth protesting steep rents in Tel Aviv to those dejected by their failure to reform Washington—should listen to Moses, reject magical thinking, and learn how to play politics

Panel Discussion

As advocacy groups increasingly use comic books in efforts to reach young minds, an art form created by immigrant Jews working out identity issues has instead become a ham-fisted tool for indoctrination

Plain Evil

This week’s parasha is a reminder of why we must never exaggerate evil, a lesson ignored by recent pop culture hits, from TV’s Damages to Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.