Vox Tablet

Vox Tablet is Tablet Magazine's weekly podcast, hosted by Sara Ivry and produced by Julie Subrin. You can listen to individual episodes here or subscribe on iTunes.

After the Holocaust, the Dutch Tried To Collect Past Due Taxes From Survivors

How one shy, whistle-blowing intern in an Amsterdam archive uncovered a travesty that insulted a decimated community

Centuries Ago, Jews Were Farmers Like Everybody Else. Why Did They Leave the Fields?

Two economists argue that literacy, not laws forbidding land ownership, created a small, widely dispersed and highly skilled minority

The Musicians of Zvuloon Dub System Marry Ethiopian Soul with Roots Reggae

If an album could be said to capture the sound of multiethnic Tel Aviv, this one would be it

Taking on Tamarind, a Staple of Syrian Jewish Cooking, With Aleppo’s Culinary Ambassador

Cookbook writer Poopa Dweck shares the key to her savory delights

Criminal Attachments: Immigration, Family, and Fraud in Soviet Brooklyn

Boris Fishman’s dark new novel explores the tensions between a grandson and his elders as he evolves into an American

Is It All Doom and Gloom for Jews in Europe? Student Leaders Say No.

Alongside the rise of xenophobic political parties and anti-Semitic incidents, there are signs of Jewish unity and revival

When We Were Illegal Aliens: Jewish Immigration Under the Quota Laws

In a new book, Libby Garland unearths the smugglers, schemes, and pluck Jews relied on to reach the United States

Joshua Ferris Takes on All Kinds of Decay in His Ambitious New Novel

‘To Rise Again at a Decent Hour’ wrestles with faith, community, baseball, and what it means to refuse to fill your cavities

Is It OK To Dance After the Holocaust? Absolutely, Says the Band Golem

The klezmer punk rockers cover lots of ground on their rollicking new album, ‘Tanz.’ They want you to get crazy to all of it.

Roz Chast Drags Us Kicking, Screaming, and Laughing, Into the Land of the Infirm

A conversation with the cartoonist who, in a new graphic memoir, finds humor and pathos in her parents’ last years

Neither Anatevka Nor Auschwitz: One Man’s Revelatory Roots Trip to Poland

Jonathan Groubert discovers just how unreliable family histories can be when held up against archives and artifacts

How an Alabama Doctor Became a Rabbi to His Patients at a Groundbreaking AIDS Clinic

In his memoir ‘Positive,’ Michael Saag warns that our broken health care system is more dangerous than the AIDS epidemic

Leonard Cohen’s Long, Strange, Sometimes Tortured Road to Mastering His Own Sound

Liel Leibovitz, who has a new book out on the rock ’n’ roll poet, looks at how Cohen’s songs evolved from bleak to transcendent

‘Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah’: Inside 19th-Century Yiddish Letter-Writing Manuals

Correspondence templates taught Jews both literacy and how to be modern. A new anthology shows their entertainment value.

When a Daughter of the Holocaust Meets a Daughter of the Third Reich

No one Lynn talked to understood how she, the child of a survivor, could cut ties with her family. Then she met Inga.

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