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Seeing Double

A Jewish literature is easy to identify. But defining Jewish art is a task of Talmudic complexity, as a new book, Jewish Art, makes clear.

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Camille Pissarro, Haystacks, Morning, Eragny, 1899; Claude Monet, Stacks of Wheat (End of Summer), 1890-91. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Art Institute of Chicago)
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For many 19th-century thinkers, the principle that Judaism was incapable of, or hostile to, visual beauty was taken for granted. In his passionately revisionist study The Artless Jew, Kalman P. Bland shows that this belief was shared by Gentiles hostile to Judaism, including Hegel and Wagner, as well as by Jews like Freud and Rosenzweig. Marc Chagall himself wrote that “monotheism was dearly bought—and because of that Judaism had to give up observation of nature with our EYES, and not just with our soul. … [Judaism] remained with no share in the treasures of graphic art.”

But to the historian Lionel Kochan, in Beyond the Graven Image, aniconism is not merely a burden on Jewish art; it also represents a possibility. The pressure to shun any image that could be taken as an idol led to a complete ban on three-dimensional human images. (This taboo was so deeply ingrained in Jewish culture that even David Ben-Gurion, after the 1948 War of Independence, resisted building statues to honor fallen Israeli soldiers.) But it also led to creative distortions of the natural world. Medieval Jewish manuscript illuminations, Kochan notes, have a “marked welcome for the image that is freakish, grotesque, distorted and hybrid,” because such images cannot be taken as imitations of anything in the earth, the air, or the water.

For the same reason, Kochan argues, “Perhaps also the physical image can be redeemed by its conversion into a concept. It is seen, not as a re-presentation of that which it purports to represent, but as an exercise in the presentation of an idea.” The application of this principle to a great deal of modern art is obvious. What are Newman’s zips if not presentations of an idea, which are all the more powerful and enigmatic because they bypass representation?

Abstraction, of course, has no exclusive appeal to Jewish artists. What is true of Newman’s zips is equally true of Kandinsky’s circles—or even of Picasso’s splintered cubist images. Indeed, Kochan writes that Gershom Scholem, the pioneering scholar of Jewish mysticism, felt that “Picasso’s ‘Woman with Violin’ had ‘something Jewish about its look’ and he grounds this judgment in the view that ‘the prohibition of the portrait in Judaism means precisely this: disintegration in the symbol.’ ” Scholem concluded that “The art of Judaism seems to me in fact to rest on the symbolic disintegration of space.”

A Jewish art defined in these terms would result in a very different canon than the one assembled by Baskind and Silver in Jewish Art. Above all, it would not be restricted to artists of Jewish origin. Its central image might be Paul Klee’s painting Angelus Novus—a work by a non-Jewish artist that has been permanently inscribed in Jewish culture by Walter Benjamin’s messianic interpretation of it:

A Klee painting named ‘Angelus Novus’ shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating. His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. This storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.

No one could have seen all that in Klee’s painting before Benjamin wrote it there. In this sense, he is certainly guilty of what Harold Rosenberg calls “interpretational stretching,” which is “indispensable to fill the gap between picture and subject whenever the artist departs from depiction.” Perhaps, then, we would better off talking not about Jewish art, but about a Jewish way of seeing and talking and writing about art—one that situates paintings in a universe of Jewish discourse about the power and danger of the image. This concept restores primacy, in what feels like an authentically Jewish way, to the word and the interpreter, rather than leaving it with the image.

Indeed, one major concern of such a Jewish way of seeing would be the connection between the image, which the Torah mistrusts so deeply, and the word, which has always been the source of value and law for Judaism. Surely it is not coincidental that so many modern Jewish artists have blended text and image in their work. This practice links Charlotte Salomon, whose monumental series “Life? or Theater?” was cut short by her death in the Holocaust; Art Spiegelman, whose graphic novel Maus, with its mouse-Jews and cat-Germans, evinces exactly the kind of “distorted and hybrid” imagery that Kochan describes as historically Jewish; and Archie Rand, whose immense series “613 Mitzvot” includes a panel illustrating and naming each of the commandments. In all these works, the artist takes the reverse approach of Newman’s, not eschewing language but engulfing it. Such Jewish artists might find their symbol in R.B. Kitaj’s Passion: Writing, which can also be found in Jewish Art. It portrays a man seated at a desk with a pen and inkwell, while at the same time he appears sealed in a coffin-like box: an image of creation under the highest pressure, in which writing and painting are part of the same death-defying act.

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Perhaps the appropriate media for art as an expression of Jewish consciousenss is only coming into being in the 21st century.
20th century art broke down the Hellenistic definition of art revived in the Renaissance. Tablet should review my new book “The Future of Art in a Postdigital Age: From Hellenistic to Hebraic Consciousness” (Intellect Books/University of Chicago Press, 2011). It proposes that the emerging 21st century definition is a Jewish one. My book begins where the book “Jewish Art” leaves off.

JCarpenter says:

Perhaps study of art for the artist’s sake is best; as illustrated by the haystacks comparison (my kids always refered to Monet’s haystacks at Chicago’s Art Institute as “muffins”), how does the work itself earn or display a cultural or religious affinity, unless deliberate in theme, as in much of Chagall’s work? You mention Rothko: I just attended the play “Red” at the Goodman Theater (highly recommended). Rothko’s character emotes and philosphizes and lays bare his soul; is he profoundly Jewish? is it expressed on his canvas? A matter of interpretation in both senses, but determined without a back-story? Muffins.

I don’t understand why, with modern technology, an essay like this does not include a hyperlink to each picture being discussed.

Great art searches for universals through the particular lens of the artist. Perhaps the best illustration of this is Fiddler on the Roof. But how to define that particularistic lens?… Was Edgar Allen Poe an American writer? His stories are rooted, not in American soil or in Poe’s American experience; they seem to emerge from the psyche unadorned by any culture. Are Beethoven’s symphonies Germanic? Situating great art in the culture that produced it has only limited value. Great art transcends particularism.

Samuel Cooper says:

Art in any shape or form is a very personal experience both for the artist and the individual experiencing that art. I think that the critics go too far with all of the cerebral exercises and analysis. Often it seems that they are trying to justify their own careers and value. Do we really need them to tell us what is and what is not and what we need to know to make our own evaluations of art?

Jacob.Arnon says:

Religious art is religious even if there are not images.

Most of us know what Muslim art is. The same for Jewish art. The problem is that Jews haven’t yet had the centuries necessary to develop a Jewish type of art like that of the Muslims tapestries in the Alhambra.

Of course Christian art is self evident if its iconic, but even Matisse composed some Christian images that were abstract.

There are some terrific Israeli canvases that depict Jewish images in an abstract way.

As a long time professional fine artist, and Jewish…naturally I was interested in seeing what Adam Kirsch had to say. I myself have struggled to find Jewish subject matter to paint, but other than painting rabbis, I didn’t, I couldn’t find something that is…visually obvious about our tribe, something that I’d find good, or worthwhile to paint. Understand, I was a figurative painted, could paint what I wanted to, but what to paint..? Understand, I wanted to paint something “significant”, something that’s meaningful and worthy of being said. I couldn’t find anything to paint. Finally, in desperation, I painted some simple, redujuctionist kind of landscapes with Hebrew texts (from siddurs and the Hagaddah) written into the sky (like posters, with messages, in words, and I counted on the caligraphy to make the painting worthwhile). Frankly, I liked what I did, and perhaps I should have continued doing them, but I did not; I moved on to other things (not Jewish necessarily, just human). I would love to paint Jewish paintings, but I cannot find something to paint that seems to me worth painting.
I note that Kirsch says at the end of his essay that basically, let’s be honest: when we write about Jewish art, we are writing about concepts; we use words, and delight in them, but as for painting that is really Jewish…except for Chagall, and a number of relatively unknown Jewish painters in Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries…I don’t think that there is a Jewish painting (there is Jewish silversmithing of ceremonial objects, that sort of thing, of course).But to say that Barnet Newman or even Mark Rothko represent a Jewish kind of painting is not, in my opinion, to be taken seriously. It’s just writers doing what they like to do. But frankly, Newman, and Rothko are painters doing what they like to do, painting what they chose to paint, never mind the Jewishisness. (I’ll add so that it is mentioned…Jack Levine and Moses Soyer did try to express their5 Jewishness).

Earl Ganz says:

Imagine if you will a Jewish painter way out west, Montana say, and he is getting an MFA in painting from an art school and he
finds a painting by another student who isn’t Jewish that’s been thrown away. So he takes it home and paints over it or rather punches it up for it seems to him a pretty good painting to start with, southwestern, the grand canyon, yet abstract as only the SW can be. And he gives it to his writing professor. He is trying to get an MFA in writing too because he’s out there and the writing professor is a Jew who will be kind to him. But he isn’t kind and won’t accept his novel as is. So he puts a curse on the professor whose wife divorces him and takes the kids and the painting and lives happily ever after in Anchorage, Alaska, the South West painting warming her living room.

I think the circumstances of a painting’s
creation has everything to do with whether it’s Jewish or not.

Matthew Baigell says:

Your reviewer should read my comments in my “Jewish Art in America: An Introduction,” (Rowman and Littlefield)and the listed appropriate bibliographical references on Greenberg-Rosenberg and what is Jewish about Jewish art.

Christopher Orev says:

Kirsh writes:
“Perhaps, then, we would better off talking not about Jewish art, but about a Jewish way of seeing and talking and writing about art—one that situates paintings in a universe of Jewish discourse about the power and danger of the image. This concept restores primacy, in what feels like an authentically Jewish way, to the word and the interpreter, rather than leaving it with the image. Indeed, one major concern of such a Jewish way of seeing would be the connection between the image, which the Torah mistrusts so deeply, and the word, which has always been the source of value and law for Judaism. ”

Perhaps, indeed! Beautifully composed and exactly correct. Thank you for this thoughtful essay.

JCarpenter says:

Amen,Christopher Orev!

Harvey Gordon says:

Kirsch’s piece came to my attention six months after it was published,

What interests me more than the perspectives offered above is the highly expressive representational work of Soutine in France and then David Bomberg, Frank Auerbach, Leon Kossoff, and, to a lesser extent, Lucien Freud in England. There seems to be a stylistic Jewishness present in this art, irrespective of subject matter, that is deeper than mere representations or illustrations of obviously Jewish content.

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Seeing Double

A Jewish literature is easy to identify. But defining Jewish art is a task of Talmudic complexity, as a new book, Jewish Art, makes clear.

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