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Hasidic Writers, Plugged In

For some ultra-Orthodox writers, the tension between obedience and skepticism in their community fuels a unique art

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(Photoillustration Tablet Magazine; original photo Shutterstock)

If you want something to read in Yiddish you can stop by any Brooklyn seforim store, where there are fat Satmar newspapers running to hundreds of pages. Their content is always the same: eulogies, wedding reportage, news digests, economic reports, sermons, serial novels meant to stoke the fires of Eastern European nostalgia, and condemnations of Zionism. Their sameness is part of a holy mission: These publications are not just reporting, but creating and reinforcing their world. Women and girls are left on the cutting room floor, as are Jews from other denominations and non-Jews in general. I try to read them every once in a while out of a sense of duty to contemporary Yiddish literature, but I find them boring, and I stop.

But there are other periodicals, a kind of parallel literature, which you can buy in the same stores and at the newspaper kiosks in the Borough Park or Williamsburg neighborhoods of New York—or which you can easily get for free as PDFs that get emailed around or posted on Facebook. Such a magazine can occasionally spring up as an alternative to Der Yid, the great gray official organ of Satmar Hasidim. For a while, Der Shtern (The Star) was one of these. Full-colored, trim, an attractive package, it included articles on topics from the wider world (science, nature, crime, war, espionage), not the usual empty rabbinic encomia—but in Yiddish, of course, and with the seal of approval that marked it safe for Hasidic consumption. It walked the line between crowd-pleasing and kosher.

In March of this year, however, something unforeseen happened as the outcome of internal Satmar political struggles: In posters plastered over Hasidic Brooklyn, rabbis declared these magazines unsuitable for the Jewish soul. Kiosk owners were ordered not to carry them. The editors of Der Shtern recruited rabbis to represent their side in a rabbinic court, and disseminated a desperate letter asking the censors to hear them out. However, despite a public campaign to reinstate the publication, they were unsuccessful, and as of this writing, the magazine has closed down.

Isaiah (not his real name) was a writer for that magazine. He has a day job, a wife, and six kids, but his true passion is the search for some truth amid his doubts. He is a Hasidic writer creating from inside with all his objections, confusions, and contortions, whose style has been shaped by the same communal constraints that he chafes under.

Isaiah and I were together recently in the Bronx at the home of a grand-dame of Yiddish letters, where we talked about his writing. He has something of a reading public, probably due to his involvement with Der Shtern, but more practically because of his blogging. He told me that recently, a popular badchan (Hasidic entertainer) who goes by the stage name “The Pester Rebbe” asked Isaiah if he could use one of his posts for an upcoming album—but with modifications.

“He wants to edit it from my ‘literary’ style into something more accessible,” Isaiah told me, looking piqued. “My friends don’t understand what I write either. They say it’s too abstract. What do you think?”

“Sometimes,” I agreed. I thought of his poem “Details”—“A world of details is tangled up in me/ Details that can’t conceive themselves”—yes, that kind of abstraction requires a literary culture that the Hasidim are just now developing.

“Can you try writing more concretely?” I suggested.

“If I did that, people would know who I was.” I didn’t try to convince him otherwise. Writing verses such as “The surprised sun/ With its face to the temporary mirror/ Pleasantly laps/ The echo of its absence”—maybe those things are enough to reveal his identity, because how many Hasidim write that way?

Ex-Hasidim are popular, or at least the books they write are. Deborah Feldman’s Unorthodox is a New York Times best-seller. Shulem Deen, the founder of Unpious.com (“Voices on the Hasidic Fringe”), now has a book contract. The first English-language novel of Anouk Markovits, a French-born woman who left the fold, is out this month under the title I Am Forbidden. Ex-Hasidic writers have told the world about the painful moral compromises, and in some cases abject failures, of the society they left and the wrenching transformations they have had to undergo.

By necessity, these writers can show us only one side of the community: the side they see when they turn and look back. William James wrote about transformations like these in his Varieties of Religious Experience: “Unhappiness is apt to characterize the period of order-making and struggle.” They saw a light on the road to Damascus—or the light of the public library across the street—and found their way to a place where their doubts were valued and their questions welcomed. Although they converted from fervent religiosity into (in some cases) an equally fervent secularism and worldliness, they are converts nonetheless. As such, they must talk about how their lives have changed for the better once they leapt over the walls of Williamsburg.

But there are also those who have decidedly not converted, who have not fled their communities. They hew to ideals they do not support because they are not yet ready to leave, or because they never will. Such a life can be exquisitely painful, but the writing that comes out of it can also be enlightening—or at the very least, can reveal a different view of the world within the Hasidic walls. Over the past few years, I have met some of the writers who are creating literature from within. I’ve come to believe that their personal struggles help us—and them—to see their surroundings in a new light.

***

Though Isaiah and I had known each other for years on the Internet, our first long chat in person happened only recently. I had to get back to Baltimore from the literary event we had both attended in the Bronx, and he gave me a ride to the train station in his boat-sized Hasidic van. On the way downtown, Isaiah recounted his multiple crises of faith. His first doubts came from reading science and modern Yiddish literature: Certain things he thought were simple he found out aren’t true at all. His faith in science was undermined by doubts about the age of the universe. The portraits of long-ago religious Jewish life in the works of Sholem Aleichem, Peretz, and other Yiddish-language writers contradicted the beliefs he had been raised with.

“Once the worm of doubt began to gnaw,” he emailed me later, “I didn’t exactly know where to stop. What else was ‘not exactly’ what I thought before?”

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StefanoNBelinda says:

The difference between those who have left (Deen, Feldman, et al.) and those who have not left the Hassidic community often has very little to do with the Hassidic community, and more to do with those individuals’ having grown up in totally dysfunctional families. 

RuthFeder says:

Excellent piece! Very well done. I’m curious about this particular line:
 If you are a woman, you might not be able to continue, even under a pseudonym.
Why specifically “woman”?

The woman-pseudonym connection is not meant to be particular to women. But women, in that paragraph, were mentioned specifically because I take it that it’s particularly difficult for women writers in the Chasidic community. That is, there are fewer chassidic women writers than men writers because they have more familial and livelihood responsibilities, making it more difficult to get the writing in. The same “room of their own” problem that women writers have anywhere. 

RuthFeder says:

Oh, I see. I thought you were referring to a chassidic-specific problem, and I couldn’t understand what you were saying. Though since chassidic woman have more kids, you could claim that there’s an element of specificity there.

It’s not a problem unique to chassidim, but it might be exacerbated there. Women writers in the secular world are still lagging behind men in pay & recognition (maybe you heard about the scandals regarding the relative counts of M and F in NYT articles etc.), but less so than among chassidim, I bet.

RuthFeder says:

Not sure about the “less so than among chassidim.” I have to think about that. I agree with the rest of what you’re saying. Though I do have to say that there are a considerable number of female authors in Binah, Ami, Mishpacha, etc., most of whom probably have large families. They may not be apikorsim, which is why they only write for these magazines, but the fact is they write. A lot! Their output is amazing, actually.

gwhepner says:

GIFT OF GAB-SENSE

 

 

Longingly
she laps

the
echoes of his absence,

hoping
that perhaps

his gilded
gift of gab-sense

might knock
sense into her,

but
since he is not present,

his
absence is a burr

which
she now finds unpleasant.

 

He’s
climbed a wall that she

believes
she cannot climb:

no
chance of liberty

from
gift of gab-sense rhyme,

and so,
while looking in

a glass,
she sees herself

as lost
soul who can’t win,

absent,
on a shelf.

gwhepner@yahoo.com

danpot says:

Just like in the rest of the world, “familial and livelihood responsibilities” don’t keep ultra-Orthodox women from producing far more literary output than men. As RuthFeder pointed out, existing ultra-Orthodox publications are dominated by women writers.

The suggestion that women have greater “familial and livelihood responsibilities” than men is probably incorrect. It is also borderline offensive to the thousands of men who have little time to think of anything but how to make a living so they can feed their 8+ children and to pay for their exorbitant yeshiva tuition costs.

Pinchus Glauber says:

“having grown up in totally dysfunctional families.”Which of the 2 groups are you referring to: the ones who left or the ones who chose to stay?

danpot says:

Just like in the rest of the world, “familial and livelihood responsibilities” don’t keep ultra-Orthodox women from producing far more literary output than men. As RuthFeder pointed out, existing ultra-Orthodox publications are dominated by women writers.
The suggestion that women have greater “familial and livelihood responsibilities” than men is probably incorrect. It is also borderline offensive to the thousands of men who have little time to think of anything but how to make a living so they can feed their 8+ children and to pay for their exorbitant yeshiva tuition costs.

Point well taken. I certainly don’t mean to be borderline offensive to anyone.

I have been told by numerous people that Der Shtern is still alive and kicking, or as Isaiah told me, “sweated through” the attacks on it. My mistake. 

philipmann says:

  Just a thought here ,connecting to a previous article .  With that major asifah scheduled for NYC on Sunday, the rabonim are once again trying to trying to pry people away from the net.

    What are the odds of them succeeding ? People go to the net because they want to ,just as the subjects in this article want to express themselves,but are deeply afraid of being discovered  and cast out of the community. The net is a meeting place for many of us. simply banning its use doesn`t negate the driving demand for it. 

    The ideas,the discussions,will not go away.

RuthFeder says:

Danpot, I’ve always found it interesting that people keep talking about how chassidic women are restricted from experiencing this or that because they have so many kids, but nobody seems to mention that large families are equally restrictive to chassidic men. In a traditional setup like the chassidic community, men are expected to financially support their families. Of course, women may work if they *wish* to do so, but it’s not expected or demanded of them. This construct, as you’ve rightfully pointed out, leaves men with little time or opportunity or energy to enjoy extracurricular activities, too.
I suspect that the omission of the male side of this equation isn’t meant to be offensive to men at all, but is simply convenient to those–and there are many–who want to criticize the ultra-orthodox lifestyle. The more you can show that women are discriminated against, the easier it is to rally people around your cause. Crying over the rights of chassidic women is, quite simply, the politically correct thing to do at this point in time. 

First it was assimilation and the Zionists who took Hebrew instead of Yiddish as the language.  As if we would all speak Hebrew to one another around the world.  With characteristic foolishness they stamped out Yiddish as a Jewish tongue and so now when I meet another MOT abroad we speak English together.  
Now the male Haradi who are amongst the least sensible people on the planet want to destroy what is left of written Yiddish.  Thanks brothers for destroying mein Mamaloshen one more time. Stamp it out in your hubris.  And while you’re at it join the Chinese in making the world all male.  Then try to reproduce.
Why do you think so many women drop out of the Haradi lifestyle.  It’s you…men who think you know the voice of Hashem but are only hearing the echo of your own ego.

thank you.
these writers, participating in the recesses of doubt while engaging in observance offer an alternative to jumping into the secular world and its disavowal of faith. This is an alternative to ‘that world’ as something ‘freeing from confines’. This space to inhabit provides real glimpses into a powerful life and it’s dilemmas. One’s we cant ignore. I’d like to find more of their work in english.
Again, thanks.

I wanted to clarify Isaiah’s remarks at his request. He says that he is not a kofer [heretic]. Rather, he has  worked very hard to reconcile his faith, which he has truly never lost, with    contradictions that are taught in the Chasidic world. Additionally, he says that he has never wanted to change Chasidic society. Rather, it is changing, because that is the way of the world. It is not becoming better or worse; rather, it is transforming, like all societies have done and always will do until the end of time. This, again, to quote Isaiah.  

Zackary Sholem Berger says:

A Yiddish version of the article, with quotes in the original language, is here: 
http://yiddish.forward.com/node/4452

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Hasidic Writers, Plugged In

For some ultra-Orthodox writers, the tension between obedience and skepticism in their community fuels a unique art