Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

Golems I Have Known

Or, Why My Elder Son’s Middle Name is Napoleon

Print Email

The audio will begin playing shortly. If you do not see a control panel above, you may need to download free RealPlayer.

As part of Nextbook’s Writers Series, Michael Chabon gave a lecture titled “Golems I Have Known. or, Why My Elder Son’s Middle Name is Napoleon.” An article in the April/May 2005 issue of Bookforum, described on the cover as “Michael Chabon’s Holocaust Hoax,” has refocused public attention on his presentation.

Nextbook has received Chabon’s permission to make the entire lecture available on Nextbook.org. This way, readers may draw their own conclusions about Chabon’s performance, rather than relying on the account woven into Paul Maliszewski’s pointed argument. “Golems I Have Known” was recorded on November 12, 2003, at the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall at Benaroya Hall in Seattle.

Print Email

Honest Criticism is hard to take, particularly from a relative, a friend, an aquaintance, or a stranger. -Franklin P Jones

I relish in reading this article. I demand to learn more on this topic.. Acknowledge gratitude you over the extent of criticism this great info.. Anyway, I am gonna subscribe to your rss and I have a fancy you write great articles again soon. Indeed utilitarian info.

Success is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration. -Thomas Alva Edison

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Golems I Have Known

Or, Why My Elder Son’s Middle Name is Napoleon

More on Tablet:

Wicked Sons: Benjamin Kerstein, Doron Rabinovici, and Norman Finkelstein

By Adam Kirsch — Is Jewish rebellion really a form of submission? Two new novels and one political critic examine apostasy.