Hasidic Writers, Plugged In

For some ultra-Orthodox writers, the tension between obedience and skepticism in their community fuels a unique art

The End of the Jewish Left

Political theorist Michael Walzer and others argue about the death of the century-long Jewish-Leftist alliance

The Feminist Marriage Plot

The attacks on domestic bliss in Alix Kates Shulman’s novel Ménage would resonate with Orthodox Jews

Bernard Lewis’ Stubborn Hope

In Notes on a Century, the historian is still optimistic about a ‘great civilization’ in the Muslim world

Auntie Semitism at the Met

Gertrude Stein’s ties to Nazis, revisited at the museum, shouldn’t eclipse her nurturing of young artists

The Most Perfect Hebrew Bible

The medieval Aleppo Codex was safeguarded for centuries in Syria. The problems started when it arrived in Israel.

Haunted by Hitler’s Hangman

The French quasi-novel HHhH, by Laurent Binet, tells the tale of assassinated Nazi leader Reinhard Heydrich while wondering whether it need be retold

India’s Most Famous Jewish Poet

Nissim Ezekiel, born in Bombay and schooled in London, wrote in English from India about familiar but foreign cultures

European Modernism, in Hebrew

With a rediscovered 1930s novel, Viennese Romance, Austrian writer David Vogel becomes a key figure in the creation of Modern Hebrew literature

Portnoy’s Complaint, in Analysis

Hebrew University professor Bernard Avishai’s playful new critical look at Philip Roth’s 1969 classic digs deep into the novel’s neurotic passion

Holocaust Pulp Fiction

The Auschwitz survivor known as Ka-Tzetnik 135633 wrote lurid novels derided as pornography when they were published. Now he’s Israel’s Elie Wiesel.

I.B. Singer, the Last Demon

In stories written in Poland and the U.S., the modernist master Isaac Bashevis Singer mined folk tales to convey the 20th century’s essential cruelty

The Devil in Sarah Stein

Thane Rosenbaum’s young-adult novel The Stranger Within Sarah Stein, takes on the Holocaust and Sept. 11 but can’t reconcile Jewish past and future

Philip Levine, Fierce About Poetry

The U.S. poet laureate on growing up Jewish in Detroit, playing tennis in verse, and hanging on to his memories, which are the source of his art

Re-Opening the American Mind

Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind remains as important as ever, and as misunderstood, 25 years after the 1980s culture wars

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