Three-Part Harmony

A new book shows how Nazism and the Ku Klux Klan prompted the American establishment to look beyond longstanding divisions and see Catholics, Protestants, and Jews as kin

On the Bookshelf

Transfigurations: iterations of the Holocaust for Christian teens, boxing enthusiasts, bibliophiles, history buffs, and neo-Sebaldians

Youth in Revolt

A new edition of Walter Benjamin’s early work sheds light his first reckonings with Jewishness and offers glimpses of the powerful thinker he would ultimately become

On the Bookshelf

Levantine lives, stone synagogues, faithful feminists, minority Muslims, and Jewish jokes

House Divided

The history of the synagogue in America, a new book shows, is one of rifts, splits, factions, and the ever-evolving tension between tradition and modernity

On the Bookshelf

Fusion confusion: comics by journalists, Lutheran rabbis, Jewish pluralism, and pork hamantaschen

Cut Short

In a memoir about her sister’s 1990 suicide, Jill Bialosky reckons with Judaism’s complicated—and still evolving—position on the taking of one’s own life

Paddle Tale

In The Mighty Walzer, Howard Jacobson serves up not just the greatest ping-pong novel ever written but a rollicking portrait of mid-century Jewish Manchester

Free Verse

To celebrate the overlap of Passover and National Poetry Month, poets Andrea Cohen, Robert Pinsky, and Mark Levine offer some selections on the themes of liberation, ritual, journeying, and food

On the Bookshelf

Literary lives: as the Seder nears, books by tale-tellers, praiseworthy and otherwise

National Treasure

A critical edition of The Washington Haggadah, a 1478 manuscript housed at the Library of Congress, shows how much—and how little—Passover has changed since the 15th century

On the Bookshelf

From the classic to the newfangled: haggadahs for Seders of every shape, size, and stripe

Fresh Exposure

A new account of the 1994 attack on a Buenos Aires Jewish community center tells the story using a distinctly Latin American genre: the novel in photos, or fotonovela

Role Model

Sigrid Nunez’s memoir of Susan Sontag in the 1970s shows the polarizing thinker in a rarely seen light—as mentor, hero, and muse

La Dolce Vita

The Free World, David Bezmozgis’ novel about a family of Soviet émigrés stuck in Rome waiting for visas to North America, explores the joys—and costs—of newfound liberty

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