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Israeli Supermodel Catfight!

Refaeli and Ginzburg feud over IDF service

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Ginzburg and Refaeli, kept separated.(Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images; John Parra/Getty Images for Ralph Lauren)

As we all know, Israel is not like America. Today’s example? A simmering catfight between the country’s two Sports Illustrated swimsuit models, superstar (and cover girl) Bar Refaeli and newcomer Esti Ginzburg. See, in America, when models fight, it’s about things like who gets to be called “The Body.” But in a recent interview with Ynet, Ginzburg—who is also a budding actress, with a part alongside Chace Crawford in Joel Schumacher’s upcoming film Twelve—went after Refaeli for failing to do her mandatory IDF service. “Enlisting is a duty, not a choice. There are a million things I don’t feel like doing, but I do them because I have to,” Private Ginzburg told the paper, which linked to a two-year-old story in which Refaeli told a reporter that she had gotten married in order to avoid the draft. “Celebrities have other needs,” she said then. She also, for what it’s worth, went on to articulate a considered position on Zionism: “Israel or Uganda, what difference does it make? It makes no difference to me. Why is it good to die for our country? What, isn’t it better to live in New York? Why should 18-year-old kids have to die? It’s dumb that people have to die so that I can live in Israel.”

Esti Ginzburg: IDF Service a Must [Ynet]

On Tablet Today

The fat came back, Begin’s bet, and a scholar looks back

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The questions about Iranian nukes has Seth Lipsky thinking back to 1981, when Israel destroyed a reactor in Iraq. Daniella Cheslow reports on the rebirth of schmaltz—no, not Neal Diamond’s newest album, liquified chicken fat. Allison Hoffman talks to Elisa New about her new book, a family memoir. And much more, here on The Scroll.

Has Neil Diamond Been Snubbed?

Public-radio show debates why he’s not in rock Hall of Fame

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(Paul Kane/Getty Images)

Neil Diamond, sometimes dubbed the “Jewish Elvis,” is back in the spotlight this week with an upcoming Christmas album and a new book, Neil Diamond is Forever by Jon Bream, who debated the star’s merits with humorist Dave Barry on WNYC yesterday. They focused on the seemingly age-old question: Why hasn’t Diamond been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?

Sure, bands like Kiss waited ten years before getting a nomination, but Diamond has been making music for 40 years, and his songs have been covered by more than 100 artists. Still, Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner’s selection committee passed over Diamond again in favor of other smooth favorites such as LL Cool J and Donna Summer. Love him or think his lyrics are pure cheese (or both), with 37 hit singles and 16 Top Ten albums, it is difficult to claim that he hasn’t contributed “to the development and perpetuation of rock and roll,” the Hall of Fame’s requirement.

Diamond’s rabid fans will have to comfort themselves this year with the schmaltz on his October 13 album, A Cherry Cherry Christmas. And in defense of his Yiddishkeit, it even contains one Hanukkah song, a “party-time” version of Adam Sandler’s “The Hanukkah Song” with DJ Ashba.

Neil Diamond: Are You a Believer? [WNYC]

Daybreak: Russian to Foot IDF Bill

Plus a cross to bear, a Nobelist, and more in the news

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• Boris Shpigel, president of the World Congress of Russian-speaking Jewry and a member of the Russian parliament, has vowed to pay the legal bills for Israeli soldiers being charged with war crimes. [JPost]
• A small cross on government land in California has spurred a court case and a debate. It may not seem like a big deal, but, says one attorney: “Religious liberty is, in part, about protecting all the touchy people.” [NPR]
• Israeli scientist Ada Yonath is the fourth woman in history to be awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry. [Haaretz]
• A look at what sanctions against Iran would actually mean. [JTA]

Sundown: In Praise of Freaks

Shyne is free, etrogs are inedible, and Roth wins again

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• Tired of always honoring Jewish saints like Golda Meir and Jonas Salk? Why not vote for your favorite Jewish “anti-hero,” complete with “accomplishments which are inseparable from their flaws”? Choices include photographer Diane Arbus (“multiple birth fetishist”) and rocker Joey Ramone (“freak”). [Washington DC JCC]
• He might not quite qualify as an anti-hero, and he’s certainly not short on adulation, but the definitely-flawed literary giant Philip Roth has received a 10,000 euro prize from Germany newspaper Die Welt. Staying true to national character, the publication lauds the author’s bang-up job portraying “the tragedy of human existence.” [Publishing Perspectives]
• Rapper Shyne, who changed his name to Moses Michael Leviy in prison, will be released today after serving nine years for assault. [Gossip and Gab]
• A blogger was stopped in her tracks from “making etrog jam and giving it out to women as a segula [charm] for easy delivery” when she learned that the citron fruits, not normally eaten, are heavily doused with pesticides. [Ingathered]
• Samaritans, a sect in the West Bank sometimes known as “Palestinian Jews,” celebrate their own version of Sukkot, with one main difference: they build their huts indoors. [China View]

No Sukkah-State Separation in New York’s Bryant Park

But the ACLU seems to be OK with it

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(NYTimes.com)

The Chabad outpost in midtown Manhattan spent $10,000 to put up a sukkah in Bryant Park, which is also home to a winter skating rink, a summer film series, and, twice a year, to big white Fashion Week tents. (The sukkah is “like Fashion Week a couple of weeks ago,” one lunchtime visitor told the New York Times’ City Room, “but with more yarmulkes.”) But City Room blogger Sarah Maslin Nir wondered why a sukkah—one, for the record, not as architecturally daring as this one, or this one, or these, but perfectly utilitarian and nicely decorated with flowers and fir branches—is OK in the city-owned, privately-run park. After all, we know that chiseled monuments of the Ten Commandments are decidedly not OK on public property, and people have spent years arguing about whether giant crosses can stand on federal land. How come a hut erected in honor of a holiday that thanks God for the bounties of the harvest, by a group devoted to welcoming misplaced Jews into the fold of observance, hasn’t generated a peep? According to a couple of lawyers Nir spoke with, the sukkah passes the church-state separation smell test because it’s more like a Christmas tree than a nativity scene—that is, something that doesn’t promote “religion” and which is open to anyone who wants to go sit inside. Daniel Mach, an ACLU lawyer, said it’s also fine as long as the city doesn’t block other religious groups from putting up similar displays.

So, go ahead, shake the lulav! We can’t wait to see what the park has planned for Diwali.

Legal Musings on Bryant Park Sukkah [NYT/City Room]

Look, Rich Jews!

JTA gloats over the Forbes 400

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While Bernard Madoff’s colossal fraud leached vast sums from the country’s wealthiest Jews in the past year, not every one of them is destitute. Quite the opposite, if the Jewish Telegraphic Agency’s assessment of Forbes’ list of the 400 richest Americans is to be trusted. According to their annotation—a questionable pursuit on account of the whiffs of both distasteful triumphalism and ostentation—at least 139 of the Richie-Riches may belong to a synagogue near you (well, if you’ve got enough spinach to pay the dues at some of the country’s more affluent houses of worship). There are few surprises in the list which includes Mayor Michael Bloomberg, (net worth of $17.5 billion), and Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page (net worth $15.3 billion each). Though the estimated wealth of all three fell in the past year, that hit didn’t stop Hizzoner from holding steady at number 8 on the general list (he’s number two among Jewish entrants) or keep the Google boys from rising in the ranking.

At Least 139 of the Forbes 400 Are Jewish [JTA]
The Forbes 400 [Forbes]

Israel Is ‘Lighting Matches’ in Jerusalem

Charges Erekat, dimming hopes for peace deal

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As Nahum Barnea told Liel Liebovitz, there is no organizational structure to the current Arab riots in Jerusalem—which has been met in the past few days by IDF countermeasures—a third intifada is a distinct possibility. But according to Jordanian journalist Razi Sa’adi, today quoted in The Jerusalem Post, if it did happen, it’d be instigated by Israel, lately accused by Palestinians of having altered course on peace negotiations in favor of settlement expansion and a sustained pushback against Washington policy. The Post today also quotes Palestinian Authority negotiator Saeb Erekat as saying that Israel is “is lighting matches in hopes of igniting a big fire,” while P.A. President Mahmoud Abbas says the violence in Jerusalem is a direct result of Israel’s desire to “Judaize” the city.

Even if this is bluster, the reason behind the bluster matters. Abbas is taking heat from Arab leaders who believe the rumors and news reports that he backed off of advancing the Goldstone report—the United Nations investigation into the Israeli assault on Gaza that blamed the IDF for war crimes—to the U.N. Security Council. Seen as a devastating blow to Israel’s international standing, the report was to have been the P.A.’s easy cudgel to wield against Israel—but Abbas, according to this narrative, buckled under White House pressure not to jeopardize any prospective deal with the Netanyahu government. The riots have only added to the sense that Abbas has lost whatever remaining confidence Palestinian supporters had in him to re-establish a unity government with Hamas and strengthen his hand against Israel. The fear, then, is that politics has gone out of the politicians and into the hands of aspiring terrorists.

Erekat: Israel is ‘Lighting a Big Fire’ [JPost]

Why Try to Re-Brand Israel?

It may be a waste of resources, ‘Commentary’ says

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Jonathan Tobin at Commentary Magazine brings to light one of the biggest questions in Israel’s history and politics: How to manage the image of a country whose raison d’etre is, in part, to convince the world of its necessity and validity, a goal that becomes increasingly elusive as factions from the Arab right to the American left stake their identities on criticism of the nation.

Tobin starts in on Maxim Magazine’s spread of cheesecake photos of female Israeli soldiers last year, which was pitched as an effort “to promote Israel as a normal country.” Never mind the disturbing implications of the equation of normality with the objectification of women, Tobin is more disturbed by what he sees as “a decision to ‘accentuate the positive’ rather than to invest more effort in speaking up for Israel’s side of the story.” He goes on to examine the merits of “rebranding” the nation versus facing political criticism head-on.

He contrasts Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s “ability to speak in short, coherent sound bites” with President Shimon Peres’s conviction, when he was prime minister, that “the problem wasn’t a matter of presentation but of wrong politics.” He also contrasts two PR initiatives: Israel21c, which focuses on advocacy journalism in the form of features about technological advances and human interest stories, steering away from the conflict; and The Israel Project, committed to “debunking the notion that Israel sought war, but was instead consistently seeking peace.” Of course, in both of these cases, the elephant in the think tank is “their own unwillingness to answer criticisms of settlement policies or the treatment of Palestinians that they may share.”

Although he sees some merits to both tactics, Tobin does not keep it a secret that he believes the “lion’s share” of advocacy resources should be directed toward “countering the evil arguments” of those who oppose Israel’s existence. And while he makes a cogent case in favor of this point, he also plants the idea, at least in this reader’s mind, that as long as there are people supporting a Jewish state that, however necessarily, relies heavily on its military and often acts first, defends itself later, there will be college kids, leftists, pacifists, self-serving politicians, and anti-Semites, who will oppose those actions. “Freedom fries” may not have done much to hurt a strong “French brand,” but, as Tobin acknowledges, “Israel is not France.”

Will the World Buy Israel’s New ‘Brand’? [Commentary, subscription required]

Is a Third Intifada Starting?

An explosion in Jerusalem may be inevitable, says an Israeli columnist

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A Palestinian youth throwing stones at Israeli forces in an east Jerusalem refugee camp yesterday.(Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images)

Earlier this week, Palestinian protesters in east Jerusalem hurled rocks at a group of Jewish worshipers praying at the sacred site known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Al Aqsa Mosque. This might have been just another violent clash in a city well-accustomed to confrontation, a brief incident quickly forgotten. But a combination of external factors, including the stalemate in peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian Authority and internal political tensions within Palestinian society are threatening to turn the clashes into a large-scale conflagration. With the riots now in their third day, some experts are predicting we may be witnessing the birth of a third intifada. We spoke with Nachum Barnea, one of Israel’s leading political columnists, about the nascent conflict and its possible outcomes.

To listen to the conversation, click here.

Palestinian official: Israel Deliberately Sparking Fire in Jerusalem [Haaretz]

Tablet Today

A critic, a thriller, a bombshell, and a human hut

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James Kirchik looks at Desmond Tutu’s criticism of Israel and sees a history of South African anti-Zionism. Adam Kirsch checks out Dutch novel God’s Gym, which reflects the “clash of fundamentalism with Western ideals and Jewish anxieties”; Kirsch also posits that marrying Marilyn Monroe was the kiss of death for the brilliant mind of Arthur Miller. Susan Shender designs a sukkah made of…people. And stay tuned to The Scroll for continuous updates.

Lucky There’s a Mishpacha Guy

Seth MacFarlane’s Fox series just got a lot Jewier

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Television’s small pantheon of animated Jewish characters just got a bit bigger: On Sunday night’s episode, entitled “Family Goy,” Lois Griffin, the matriarch on Seth MacFarlane’s Fox hit Family Guy, learned that she was Jewish. She should have seen it coming: her maternal grandmother’s maiden name, her mother tells her in one of the episode’s many uncouth moments, was Hebrewberg, which was the Ellis Island version of Hebrewbergmoneygrabber.

Lois’s husband, the loudobese blowhard Peter, is ecstatic at first about his wife’s newfound status as a member of the chosen people—briefly, he’s an enthusiastic attendee at synagogue, and puts the kids in Jewish day school—but he soon remembers his Catholicism and confronts his wife. “I’m a Catholic,” he tells her, “and I want to live in a Catholic house.”

“Well, I’m Jewish,” Lois responds, “and I want to live in a nicer house.” Spoken like a real Jew.

Family Goy [Hulu.com]

Daybreak: Peace is Relative

A stymied traveler, disputed history, and more in the news

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• Palestinian farmers in the West Bank are grateful for the relative peace since the second intifada ended—delicate as it may be—that allows them to tend crops freely. [Reuters]
• Delicate indeed—amid the ongoing disputes in Jerusalem, Hamas attacked Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas, leader of the rival Fatah party, for agreeing to delay retaliation for alleged Israeli war crimes in Gaza. [AP]
• And, although Defense Minister Ehud Barak got through his visit unscathed last month, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Moshe Yaalon has canceled a planned trip to the United Kingdom after warnings that he may be arrested there for those alleged war crimes. [Times of London]
• Experts weigh new evidence in an ongoing debate about the United States’ response to the Holocaust. [NYT]

Sundown: Bless You, Drive Through

‘Mount’ing troubles, dystopia, and the next Holocaust flick

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• In what sounds like a joke from the movie L.A. Story, a synagogue in Miami has erected a “drive-through sukkah” in the middle of its parking lot for lulav-shakers on the go. [Miami Herald]
• Michael Mann, the creator of such films as Public Enemies, Miami Vice, and Last of the Mohicans, is set to direct an upcoming World War II film based on a Spanish novel about a Hungarian and a German Jew who team up as war photographers. [Hollywood News]
• An interview with Leon de Winter, a Dutch writer whose new novel Right of Return (not yet available in English) portrays Israel in 2024 as a nation that has been all but abandoned after violence led citizens to decide “they love their children more than their country.” [HuffPost]
• Those Israel has called “radical elements who wish to create a crisis around the Temple Mount” have somewhat succeeded; violent skirmishes have escalated around the disputed site, which is considered holy to both Jews and Muslims. [AP]

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Skips Mass, Thanks

But much of Supreme Court celebrates pre-term Mass

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All nine justices, at their annual photo session last week.(Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

The Supreme Court convened this morning for the start of its new term, which features a docket heavy with cases concerning business regulation and oversight of the financial system. But the opening ceremonies started yesterday, with the Red Mass, an annual Catholic service held at St. Matthew’s Cathedral in Washington that recalls medieval entreaties for blessings on “those engaged in the administration of justice.” (Chief Justice John Roberts’s wife, Jane, is parliamentarian of the John Carroll Society, which began arranging the services in 1953 with the goal of getting the justices’ ears.) This year, the blessings included a homily by Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of the Galveston-Houston archdiocese, who asked the justices to help defend the rights not just those who are voiceless for lack of influence or power, but those who are “literally voiceless, not yet with tongues and even without names”—in other words, unborn children.

It’s not terribly surprising that five of the Court’s six Catholic members—Roberts and Associate Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, and Samuel Alito—were there, but so was Stephen Breyer, who is Jewish but goes every year anyway. Who wasn’t there? Well, Clarence Thomas (Catholic!) sent his regrets, and John Paul Stevens (the lone Wasp on the current court) skipped it, too. And no one expected Ruth Bader Ginsburg to interrupt her Sukkot observances (or, you know, whatever she was doing yesterday) to go; girlfriend has made it clear she doesn’t need to hear it from the Catholics. “I went one year and I will never go again, because this sermon was outrageously anti-abortion,” Ginsburg told Abigail Pogrebin, who interviewed the justice for the anthology Stars of David. “Even the Scalias, even though they’re very much of that persuasion, were embarrassed for me.”

Supreme Court Majority Opinion: Attend Red Mass [WSJ]

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