Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

The Afterlife of a Russian Bard

The influence of Vladimir Vysotsky, who would have been 75 this week, reaches far beyond his homeland

Print Email
Vladimir Vysotsky.(Irina/Flickr)

Vladimir Vysotsky, Russia’s beloved balladeer, would have turned 75 this week. Though he died more than three decades ago, at the age of 42, he is still revered as a singer and poet who captured the mood, and the soul, of a dejected generation. But while Vysotsky’s music and persona clearly spoke to a particular time and place (the USSR in the post-Stalinist “Thaw” era), his songs have been adopted by social movements all over the world, including, most recently, Israel’s tent protesters during the summer of 2011.

Today, on Vox Tablet, Liel Leibovitz looks at the too-short life, and enduring afterlife, of this remarkable man and considers what it is that makes his ballads so resonant for so many. [Running time: 10:11.] 

Print Email

Excellent reporting. One minor clarification, though. Vysotskii died of drug (not alcohol) overdose.

A great podcast, thank you. Wysocki is the (!) voice of non-conformism, just think about his fantastic song “Wolf hunt” (an excerpt was played during the podcast). It was especially interesting to see how a soviet poet influenced today’s Israeli culture.

arktikwolf says:

And crappy Russian drugs at that. What a waste.

genelevit says:

Here is the song “Wolf hunt” with English subtitles:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZWGRyPQUxs

Marina Sapir says:

The author did not mention couple of important things about Vysotsky: he was a great actor, played in theater an movies. All his roles become favorites, an important part of Russian mass culture. I did not see the movies for more than 20 years, but I remember them well. Don Juan is one of his best roles, I think. He was irresistible, indeed. Also, he wrote great prose too.

Mike says:

Thank you, really enjoyed listening to that.

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

The Afterlife of a Russian Bard

The influence of Vladimir Vysotsky, who would have been 75 this week, reaches far beyond his homeland

More on Tablet:

Tweets Cost a Professor His Tenure, and That’s a Good Thing

By Liel Leibovitz — Steven Salaita’s case isn’t about free speech. It’s about common sense, and the rightful consequences of bigotry and violence.