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Sway to the Music

Bluesman Jeremiah Lockwood finds his voice in his grandfather’s liturgical repertoire

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Jeremiah Lockwood earned his musical chops playing the New York subway circuit with blues musician Carolina Slim. He was thirteen when they first collaborated.

But Lockwood’s music training stretches much further back. As a child, he regularly listened to the musical recordings of his grandfather, Jacob Konigsberg, a renowned cantor from Cleveland. Later, his grandfather began teaching Lockwood his interpretations of traditional prayers. Now, Lockwood is featuring that music in his fusion jazz-rock-klezmer band, The Sway Machinery.

He talks with us about his grandfather’s pedagogical method, the Sway’s innovations, and the connections between chazzanut and the blues.

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Hands down, Apple’s app store wins by a mile. It’s a huge selection of all sorts of apps vs a rather sad selection of a handful for Zune. Microsoft has plans, especially in the realm of games, but I’m not sure I’d want to bet on the future if this aspect is important to you. The iPod is a much better choice in that case.

Sorry for the huge review, but I’m really loving the new Zune, and hope this, as well as the excellent reviews some other people have written, will help you decide if it’s the right choice for you.

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Sway to the Music

Bluesman Jeremiah Lockwood finds his voice in his grandfather’s liturgical repertoire

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