Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Secrets in Brooklyn, Violence in Tel Aviv

The week that was on Tablet Magazine

Print Email
(Margarita Korol/Tablet Magazine)

For Shavuot, Joan Nathan reported on on Israeli artisanal cheese. Hillel Y. Levin called on his fellow Orthodox Jews not to inject religion into the debate over (civil) same-sex marriage. And prominent scholar Jan T. Gross examined the notorious Polish “gold rush of Treblinka,” an event which was even more horrifying than it sounds.

On The Scroll, Sara Ivry explored how one Hasidic woman’s portrayal of herself sparked an Internet firestorm. There was ethnic violence in south Tel Aviv, Yiddish on the Citi Field Jumbotron, and just possibly an Iranian enrichment facility in the East Village. The Friedmometer registered a new reading. Egypt voted for a president for the first time in modern history. And Giulio Meotti was caught plagiarizing, many times.

Mark Zuckerberg got married. Baz Luhrmann revealed his Meyer Wolfsheim. A Chinese company sought Jews. Google gave an Israeli university a helping hand. Professor Jerry Cohen helped Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng to stand tall.

Brad Ausmus talked Israeli baseball, several writers talked Mormon politics, and Sarah Wildman and I talked, or rather, our heads blogged.

Print Email
yevka says:

 http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/24/african-migrants-attacked-in-tel-aviv/

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Secrets in Brooklyn, Violence in Tel Aviv

The week that was on Tablet Magazine

More on Tablet:

Is Leonard Cohen’s New Album His Best Yet?

By Liel Leibovitz — The singer has had better songs, but his new record captures his ideas more clearly than ever