Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Fun at Camp

What summer camp with Hamas looks like

Print Email
Palestinian children participating in a Hamas protest(Getty)

Elhanan Miller at The Times of Israel has a disturbing summer dispatch from Gaza, where young campers are participating in a Hamas-run program called “We will live honorably”:

“We will live honorably” provides activities to some 70,000 children across the Gaza Strip throughout the summer, the Quds News Network reported this week. But startling photos of the camp’s activities display children walking on nails and on knife blades.

The camp’s organizers even constructed a model of an Israeli security prison, to “reenact the daily suffering of Palestinian prisoners,” the Palestinian Maan news agency reported. The “prison,” made up of six rooms, is meant to demonstrate different aspects of treatment endured by security prisoners: an investigation room, a detention room, a confession extortion room, a solitary confinement room, a courtyard and an infirmary.

Going back to 2007, different summer camp programs in Gaza were successfully run by the United Nations Relief Works and Agency (UNRWA), providing an outlet for a quarter of a million children. But with budget cuts and Hamas intimidation (including arson) against it, UNRWA lessened its presence each summer. This year in Gaza, Hamas is the only show in town.

As its known, Hamas was first elected largely due in part to Palestinian disenchantment with Fatah, which had been a corrupt ruling force for decades under Yasser Arafat. Voters were convinced that Hamas would provide the social services that Palestinians so badly lacked, that they would build infrastructure, provide food, and boost the economy. However, Hamas has done little to improve life in Gaza and this story is par for its cynical course. This manipulation of Gaza’s children on television and its outlets like summer camp as well as continued incitement against Israel will not allow anyone to live honorably. In fact, programs like this will set Palestinian life back generations.


With UNRWA cutting back, Hamas dominates Gaza summer camp scene
[Times of Israel]

Print Email

Tricks like walking on hot coals or beds of nails are fun especially because of the sense of peril they invoke (even though a bit of physics shows that they’re not dangerous). I’ve done stuff like break an arrow by walking into it with my neck. WIth kids, I expect they combine it with a bunch of malarky about how faith in Allah makes you strong enough to endure it.

As for the mock prison, the article doesn’t say (probably for good reason) that it’s not an accurate portrayal. While Gilad Shalit was held prisoner and while Jews were imprisoned in the Soviet Union for wanting to leave weren’t Jewish children taught in detail about the hardships those people were going through?

ginzy1 says:

Radical Palestinian summer camps are nothing new. Back in the summer of 2000, before the outbreak of the Olso Accords War, the NY Times ran a story about the radical Gaza summer camp (I believe run by Hamas, but sanctioned (in the positive sense) by the official, Arafat-run Palestinian Authority ), the military training give the kids, and the extreme hatred toward Jews & Israel (in any border configuration) that was inculcated there. The Times being the Times failed to connect the dots as to the significance and implications of the summer camp (why let some ugly facts disturb a great, P.C. narrative?).

In other words, so what’s new here? Dog bites man.

hg

Jerusalem / Efrata

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Fun at Camp

What summer camp with Hamas looks like

More on Tablet:

Why You Should Watch ‘Funny Girl’

By Isabel Fattal — Rediscovering the relevance of a Streisand classic