Shabbat Candles(Fickr)

Today in the Washington Post, Adam Greenwald and Geoffrey Nelson-Blake, a 28-year-old Conservative rabbi and a 30-year-old Seventh-day Adventist minister, have some compelling thoughts about the observance of the Sabbath and its increasing popularity, especially among the younger, constantly plugged-in set. They write:

An insistence on creating sacred time and space is one of the key components of nearly all faiths. Traditional Jews and many Christian denominations observe one day a week of sanctified rest. Muslims around the world pause five times a day to bow in prayer. Many religions derived from Eastern traditions include a daily meditative practice. While many Americans feel distant from religion, establishing fixed times for personal renewal has universal appeal.

In spiritual communities across the country — from Jewish worship groups such as Washington’s DC Minyan and Los Angeles’s IKAR to churches too numerous to count — young people come together each week to collectively “power down” from the busy world. The ancient act of gathering in a house of worship on the Sabbath now carries a distinctly countercultural tone: It’s a declaration of independence from the iPhone, a defiant assertion that an e-mail can be left unanswered for a day without causing disaster, a formal protest against the social media machine. It’s a quiet revolution but one of enormous power.

It’s a great read and a very good thought.

Why Young People Are Setting Aside Time for Faith [WaPo]