Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Sundown: N.J. Informer Disowned By Father

Plus, Israel threatens Hezbollah

Print Email

• Rabbi Israel Dwek, who leads Deal, N.J.’s Syrian Jews, proclaimed that he has renounced and will sit Shiva for his (still-living) son, Solomon, who was central to the FBI investigation that netted last week’s 44 arrests. Rabbi Dwek cited the Talmudic Law of Moser, which forbids a Jew from informing on another Jew to a Gentile. [PolitickerNJ]
• Following a United Nations official’s formal finding that Hezbollah has violated the 2006 ceasefire by storing rockets near Israel’s border, Israel reportedly warned U.N. officials that if the international peacekeeping force in southern Lebanon does not restrain the group, Israel will be forced to act. [Arutz Sheva]
• Israel’s government formally complained to Holland’s over the Dutch embassy’s having given money to human rights group Breaking The Silence. The organization has collected anonymous accusations of Israeli military abuses in Gaza. [Haaretz]
• The controversial film Rachel, about Rachel Corrie, the American activist killed in Gaza, screened at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival to many a boo and a hiss. [Forward]
• The American Jewish Committee’s Berlin branch requested an official investigation into whether Amazon’s German affiliate has violated German law by selling books that deny the Holocaust. [JPost]

Print Email
2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Sundown: N.J. Informer Disowned By Father

Plus, Israel threatens Hezbollah

More on Tablet:

The First Kosher Comic Book Blazed a Trail for Orthodox Outreach

By Marjorie Ingall — It wasn’t as big as Batman, but ‘Mendy and the Golem’ gave Jewish kids a taste of pop culture—with a rabbinical seal of approval