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Today on Tablet

David Goldstein on his grandfather’s death and life

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The author’s grandfather, 1950(Courtesy of the author)

Today on Tablet, David Goldstein writes on memory and meaning as he sought to find out about his grandfather, a Holocaust survivor.

After the war Papa owned a supermarket in the Bronx, which he sold around the time I was born. Without the store to occupy his time, he was perpetually restless. There was an unmistakable sadness to him, his cheeks lean and hollowed, his icy blue eyes a shade too big for his face. Whenever he visited, he’d take me onto his lap, kiss the top of my head, and tell me that I was his lawyer. It was a joke I didn’t understand then, and it makes little sense to me now. He was gentle and sweet, and I was his lawyer. Then he disappeared. I’ve been searching for him for 30 years now.

Be sure to read the rest here.

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Today on Tablet

David Goldstein on his grandfather’s death and life

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