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Obama at the UN: Tale of the Tape

The Scroll breaks down Obama’s speech today at the General Assembly

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U.S. President Barack Obama addresses the U.N. General Assembly on September 24, 2013 in New York City.(Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

President Obama spoke at the UN General Assembly earlier today, an address which was broadcast on television and available online. He had some harsh words for Russian President Vladimir Putin, and big hopes for an Iranian nuclear deal. He talked for a while. Here’s what went down:

Running time: 43 minutes.

Allotted time: 15 minutes.

People who said something about it: None.

Theme: There’s no place like the Middle East. (Literally, there’s nowhere else to talk about.)

Putin Punch #1: “I believe America is exceptional” because it stands up not just for its own interests but “for the interests of all.”

Not mentioned: Stopping Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

(The Audacity of) Second-Term Dreams: Israel-Palestinian peace and Iran nuclear deal.

Syria: U.S. to give $340 million in Syria relief (Iran to give billions in Syria distress).

Putin Punch #2: It’s “an insult” to say that anyone but Assad carried out chemical weapons attack.

Gauntlet Thrown: There must be a “strong security council resolution” on Syria.

Vague Unnamed Consequences: “There must be consequences.”

Word count: “Together” = 3; “nuclear” = 6; “resolve” = 4; “change” = 3.

What’s up next: Israeli boycott of Iranian speech.

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Obama at the UN: Tale of the Tape

The Scroll breaks down Obama’s speech today at the General Assembly

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