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Today on Tablet

Jewish Body Week continues with a video starring author A.J. Jacobs

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A.J. Jacobs on Jewish Body Week from Tablet Magazine on Vimeo.

In today’s Jewish Body Week video testimonial, author and Esquire editor A.J. Jacobs talks about his big Jewish beard. Tablet Magazine book critic Adam Kirsch considers Benjamin D. Sommer’s new book, The Bodies of God and the World of Ancient Israel. Vox Tablet host Sara Ivry talks to author Eliza Slavet about her Racial Fever: Freud and the Jewish Question and the great psychoanalyst’s theories on the inheritance of Jewishness. And we’ve got two favorites from the archives: Emory professor Sander L. Gilman’s essay on the ongoing fascination with Jews and intelligence, and a Vox Tablet interview with poet and professor Joy Ladin, who lived most of her life as a man, Jay. Jewish Body Week will continue tomorrow and Friday, and, of course, we’ll have more on The Scroll throughout today.

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Today on Tablet

Jewish Body Week continues with a video starring author A.J. Jacobs

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