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Sundown: Explaining Hitler’s Hatred

Plus is the construction freeze bad for the environment?

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• A new book offers a theory for the central place anti-Semitism held in Nazi ideology: Hitler’s mother, who had breast cancer, died after receiving the then-standard treatment—administered, as it happened, by a Jewish doctor. [Haaretz]
• Environmental groups from “Judea” and “Samaria” argue that the temporary West Bank construction freeze is bad for the environment, because some necessary infrastructure is not yet completed. [Arutz Sheva]
The New Yorker’s “Shouts and Murmurs” humor column this week contains fractured Hanukkah stories. [The New Yorker]
• A venerable fish market has been sued for alleged sexual and racial employment harassment at its Brooklyn location. According to the complaint, some slurs incorporated both the alleged victims’ race (black) and the alleged perpetrators’ (Jewish). [NBC New York]
• In the middle of last night, police arrested two men who were trying to spray-paint over the new, controversial Bedford Avenue bike path in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. [Vos Iz Neias?]
The Miami Herald’s report of the 75th birthday party that Naomi Sisselman Wilzig, who is the widow of an Auschwitz survivor and the operator of the World Erotic Art Museum, must be read to be believed. [Miami Herald]

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Sundown: Explaining Hitler’s Hatred

Plus is the construction freeze bad for the environment?

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