While you were shaking the lulav and reclining in your Sukkah, Gal Gadot was doing what Gal Gadot does best, which is schooling the world on how we do it in the 972. It wasn’t that she was trying hard to be a proud Israeli, which would’ve come off as pandering and cloying. Instead, she actually is a proud Israeli, and she shared her uncomplicated delight with her country and her culture in a way that was joyous, infectious, and absolutely wonderful. And so, in case you missed it, here are your top three moments in Gal Gadot:

Gal and the Shokolad Para

What do you bring when you go on The Tonight Show? Most guests come carrying some canned story about that time they goofed in an adorable way, tweaked by their handlers and delivered with forced charm. Gadot brought chocolate. And not just any chocolate: Shokolad Para, which, but for the grace of Bamba, is Israel’s most iconic junk food item. And not just any Shokolad Para: The kind Gadot offered Jimmy Fallon is an Israeli stoner’s delight, stuffed with Pop Rocks. Watch her and Jimmy eat it and then put their mouths by the mic to capture all that delightful popping and rocking, and you can imagine what it was like to go to film school in Tel Aviv in the drug-addled Nineties:

Gal Plays Charades

Here’s the thing: Israelis don’t play games. I mean that both figuratively and literally. From Pictionary to Hot Potato to Cards Against Humanity, we don’t have the time or the patience. When we get together with friends, we either fight about politics or make love or, on special occasions, do a little bit of both. Anything else is considered childish and strange. When Gadot gamely played Charades with Fallon and his other guests, then, she looked very much like the Israeli army veteran crashing a college party and wondering why these kids, more or less her age, were acting like overgrown toddlers. She had a hard time getting going, but watch her kill it by the end:

Gal Rocks the Hebrew

In a first, the episode of Saturday Night Live Gadot hosted was broadcast live in Israel, with about three-quarters of the nation, according to a deeply unscientific poll I’ve conducted among my friends, staying up to watch her rock. She did not disappoint: At the very beginning of her monologue, she turned to the camera and, in Hebrew, joked about the show’s writers being not very sophisticated and asking her to eat hummus in every sketch. God bless:





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