Each week, the Scroll will be highlighting upcoming exhibits, performances, and cultural events around the country.

Minneapolis

Beginning on January 20th, the Sabes Jewish Community Center is hosting the Twin Cities Jewish Humor Festival. This year will feature stand-up comedy, theater, film, visual art, and workshops that celebrate the Jewish people’s contributions to humor. One of the highlights is a set by stand-up comedian Adam Grabowski, who was named “the funniest one” by Simon Cowell on America’s Got Talent. There will also be an art exhibit that will showcase humorous photographs taken by seventh and eighth grade students at Heilicher Minneapolis Jewish Day School, along with works by their art instructor Victoria Thor and local artist Debra Fisher Goldstein. (On view through Jan.28, 2018; admission varies based on performance).

New York

The Metropolitan Museum presents Delirious: Art at the Limits of Reason 1950 -1980. The exhibit is split into four sections: Vertigo, Excess, Nonsense, and Twisted, and features roughly a hundred works by sixty-two artists, including Philip Guston, Nancy Grossman, Eva Hesse, and Sol LeWitt. (On view through Jan.14, 2018; adult admission $25).

The Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Jewish Museum have partnered up to present the New York Jewish Film Festival. This year marks the twenty sixth iteration of this yearly festival, which showcases premieres of new films along with screenings of the classics like The Producers. This year’s festival features the premiere of Shalom Rabin, a film diary that follows director Amos Gitai as he journeys to Washington, Cairo, Gaza, and Jerusalem at the time of the Oslo Accords along with never before seen footage of Yitzhak Rabin shortly before his assassination. There is also programing in memory of Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder. (Beginning January 11th; adult admission $14).

Paris

The Museum of Jewish Art and History Paris presents René Goscinny: Au-delà du rire, which explores the life of the French-Polish comics editor and writer. This exhibit chronicles his life as the child of Polish and Ukrainian Jews who grew up to become the creator of one of the most popular comic strips ever, Astérix. This exhibit explores how René Goscinny turned the comic strip which was mostly intended for kids into a high art form. On view through March 4, 2018; adult admission €12).

Is there an event or exhibit in your area we should know about? Email info@tabletmag.com with the details and a link.





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