Looking to shake things up at the Shabbos table this week? The Scroll’s got you covered.

Carciofi alla giudìa—literally, “Jewish-style artichokes”—are one of the most famous creations of Jewish-Roman cuisine. Dating back to the 16th century, this deep-fried delight is sure to impress your dinner guests.

Below, here’s a recipe from for carciofi alla giudìa, courtesy of Daniel Gritzer and SeriousEats.com.

Ingredients:

3 lemons, divided
3 pounds artichokes (about 24 baby artichokes or 6 large artichokes)
1 to 2 quarts of Extra-virgin olive oil, canola oil, or vegetable oil, for frying
Kosher salt

Directions:

1. Fill a large bowl with water; halve and squeeze 2 lemons into it. Trim artichokes following Roman-Jewish artichoke guidelines shown here: Remove tough dark green outer leaves to expose more tender light-green leaves within, then, using a paring knife, cut off top half of each leaf and trim base and stem. Trimmed artichokes will look like a closed rosebud. Transfer the peeled artichokes to the bowl of lemon water as you work, covering them with a clean kitchen towel to keep them completely submerged.

2. In a large saucepan, heat 2 to 3 inches of oil to 280°F. Add artichokes (they should produce a steady but non-violent stream of bubbles) and cook until tender (you should be able to pierce their hearts easily with a fork), adjusting heat to maintain a steady bubble, about 10 minutes for baby artichokes and 15 minutes for larger ones. Turn larger artichokes frequently for even cooking.

3. Using a slotted spoon or spider, transfer artichokes to a paper towel-line plate. Let stand until cool enough to handle. Using your hands, gently pull open each artichoke “bud” so that it resembles an open flower. If using large artichokes, remove and discard the hair “choke” in the center of the artichoke. Increase oil temperature to 350°F.

4. Fry artichokes until browned and crisp, 2 to 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or spider, transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain. Season immediately with salt. Transfer to plates and serve right away with wedges of remaining lemon.

Serves 4-6.

Related: A Thanksgiving Pasta Inspired By Roman Jews
Finding My Jewish Home—in Rome





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