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‘Heeb’ Goes Online-Only

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As was first rumored nearly nine months ago, Heeb, the irreverent (you have to use that adjective) Jewish magazine, announced that it is going online-only. (The cover of its final issue depicted a post-apocalyptic landscape: Prophesy, anyone?) Rumor had had it that the magazine was spending lots of money, and that it continued to do so even after the recession hit.

“We believe that in a world in which Jewish periodicals outdo themselves in attempting to highlight just how endangered Jews are,” writes editor and publisher Joshua Neuman, “there should be one Jewish media outlet that actually makes its readers smile. So whether online, or in print, we like to think that we can all still have a little fun—and don’t worry, Ahmadinejad will still be waiting when we’re done.”

So, Heeb, welcome to the world of online-only Jewish journalism. We think you’ll enjoy it.

So Much for Controlling the Media [Heeb]
Earlier: Is ‘Heeb’ On Its Way Out?

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After the Roseanne Barr “Hitler/Cookie” incident: even an online presence is too much.

Pete,

Seriously, baking gingerbread men in a oven, wearing a Nazi uniform. I wondered what that meant! Heeb is a disgrace of magazine, I’m glad its print edition is gone. Hopefully their online presence will fade away quickly too.

HEEB? Gosh. Is that still around? I thought they stopped publishing years ago.

Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.

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‘Heeb’ Goes Online-Only

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