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(Brian Scott/Boondesign)

Our Hanukkah remix album is getting a lot of love—except from one exacting reader, who did not approve of its title. As Marc Weidenbaum explained in the liner notes, he arrived at that title, Anander Mol, Anander Veig, this way:

As the project was nearing completion, I got in touch with a wise friend, one who knows far more Yiddish than I do—which is to say, he knows more than just words involving disappointment, food, bodily functions, and relatives. I asked my friend, “How would you say ‘remix’ in Yiddish?” Being wise, he thought better than to come up with a new word; he thought better than to reply with some snazzy neologism, some antiquated-sounding yet entirely newly created term, some ersatz steampunk Yiddish.

Instead, he sent me a steady stream of short phrases, each an attempt to probe, in Yiddish, what a remix is at its heart. The best of his probings, “anander mol, anander veig,” became the title of this set. It means, in a literal translation, “another time, another way”—old ways, reconsidered; old modes, remodeled; old music, remade.

But, in fact, as our esteemed columnist Eddy Portnoy explained this morning, we may have done a little too much remixing. “For a correct translation of ‘another time, another way,’ the title should read, ‘An andere tsayt, an anderer oyfn,'” he wrote. “The way you have it is ‘another instance, another road.’ I guess that works metaphorically, but it’s not correct in Yiddish. Worst-case scenario, leave it as is, but at least split the indirect articles from the adjectives.”

Well, we’re in the worst-case scenario. We can’t change it at this point, but we admit the misstep. Are there even more alternatives, budding and seasoned Yiddish speakers? Leave them in the comments!

Anander Mol, Anander Veig





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