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The D.C. (Suburban) Power Couple

Huppah Dreams

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Benjamin Reschovsky and Allison Frumin.(NYT)

Each Monday (or Tuesday of holiday weekends!), we choose the most interestingly Jewish announcement from that Sunday’s New York Times Weddings/Celebrations section. There were several compelling candidates this week, but since your Scroll editor happens to hail from the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., we went with the couple that do the same: Allison Frumin and Benjamin Reschovsky, married Thursday in D.C. (reception in Chevy Chase). If you know the area at all, you know how hilariously typical their four parents’ jobs are: “epidemiologist at the National Cancer Institute;” “senior fellow at the Center for Studying Health System Change;” “mergers and acquisitions lawyer at the Federal Trade Commission;” and “parliamentarian of the United States Senate” (here is what the parliamentarian does; here is the requisite Slate Explainer.)

An eagle-eyed source notes that when the bride’s parents were married in 1981 (at Indian Spring, one of the two main Jewish country clubs in the Maryland ‘burbs), her father was a mere assistant parliamentarian. May the newlyweds, one an associate at a law firm and the other getting his doctorate in physics, receive similar upgrades during their time together. Mazel tov to the happy couple!

Allison Frumin, Benjamin Reschovsky

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Eric F. says:

FYI–Indian Spring CC closed a few years ago.

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The D.C. (Suburban) Power Couple

Huppah Dreams

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