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Daybreak: Gas Deal Shadows Israel-Egypt Peace

Plus anti-Semitism at the CIA, and more in the news

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Egypt's natural gas headquarters in Cairo.(Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images)

• While both sides are now downplaying the political implications, Egypt halted the flow of natural gas to Israel over the weekend, a move that undoubtedly questions the staying power of the Camp David treaty. [NYT]

• In a newly revealed deposition, former CIA director George Tenet acknowledged disturbing anti-Semitism (and a concerted response to it) at the agency. [The Daily Beast]

• President Abbas and Prime Minister Fayyad are apparently not currently on speaking terms since Fayyad at the last minute refused to head a delegation last week to Prime Minister Netanyahu. This is not what they mean by Palestinian unity. [Haaretz]

• Netanyahu formed a small commission to legalize three West Bank outposts rather than bringing it to a cabinet vote, in an attempt to quell internal squabbling over a different West Bank neighborhood slated for evacuation. [Haaretz]

• Iran claims to have gleaned intelligence as well as the know-how to replicate from the U.S. drone that crashed over its territory recently. Experts believe this may be more about propaganda. [NYT]

• Lebanon—including Hezbollah—claim it would only attack Israel if directly attacked first, which is to say, not necessarily in the event of an Israeli strike on Iran. [Israel HaYom]

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Daybreak: Gas Deal Shadows Israel-Egypt Peace

Plus anti-Semitism at the CIA, and more in the news

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