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How Do You Solve A Problem Like Shoshanna?

This week in Jewcy, our partner site

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The weeks before HBO’s new show Girls premiered it seemed like everyone had an opinion, especially about the show’s authenticity. There was talk of the sex scenes feeling real (or not, or that not being the point) and of the bodies of those having sex being real. Yet with all the focus on sex, one character was glaringly missing from the discussion: Shoshanna.

Played by David Mamet’s daughter Zosia, Shoshanna is everything the girls of Girls aren’t. She’s still in college. She has no financial concerns. And most importantly, she’s never had sex, a seeming character flaw that she admits to bashfully. With the third episode behind us, it’s time to ask the question that’s surely on everyone’s mind, or at least everyone here at Jewcy: Does Girls have a Shoshanna problem?

To be fair, Mamet does a great job playing a character that has no business being on the show. Her quips, while sometimes even more cringe-inducing than Lena Dunham’s character Hannah Horvath’s attempts to be sexy or professional (or both), are delivered flawlessly. But that only momentarily distracts from the fact that her character is so majorly absurd and even borderline offensive (as June Thomas put it, “she’s the Facebook chat of the group”).

Read the rest at Jewcy.com

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How Do You Solve A Problem Like Shoshanna?

This week in Jewcy, our partner site

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