Melancholy Gay Arabia

Moroccan novelist Abdellah Taïa confronts the challenges of gay life in the Mideast in An Arab Melancholia

Auntie Semitism at the Met

Gertrude Stein’s ties to Nazis, revisited at the museum, shouldn’t eclipse her nurturing of young artists

Edouard Vuillard’s Jewish Muses

A Jewish Museum show reveals an avant-garde painter in turn-of-the-20th-century Paris transformed by his patrons into a mere portraitist

La Différence

While American Jews cultivate a hyphenated identity, French Jews like to make themselves wholly French. Do we still share a cultural language?

The Prague Cemetery

In a new novel, 19th-century Europe is a land of ominous mystery, and a Parisian junk shop is the passage to a lost world. An excerpt.

Tropical Storm

Henry Miller had complicated feelings about Jews, but his works wouldn’t have reached American audiences without them

Chai Fashion

“Chic Rabbis,” Jean Paul Gaultier’s early-1990s collection inspired by Orthodox Jewish apparel, remains a touchstone in an exhibition of his couture

Occupy Paris

The economic and social upheavals that rocked France and its Jewish prime minister 75 years ago bear an uncanny resemblance to Occupy Wall Street

Still Wandering

More than a century after false charges were leveled against him, the unquiet ghost of Alfred Dreyfus continues to roam the streets of Paris

Partisan

The Spanish writer Jorge Semprún, who died in June, survived Buchenwald and had a love-hate relationship with Communism in postwar Europe. A longtime friend remembers his star power and derring-do.

Mrs. DSK

The mystery of Anne Sinclair and her steadfast support of her husband

Disorderly Conduct

The writer and critic Bernard Lazare, Dreyfus’ earliest defender, wed Zionism and anarchism to become one of France’s most famous polemicists and a political clairvoyant

New Kid

David Tanis, Chez Panisse chef, cookbook author, and now food columnist for the New York Times, is best known for his seasonal cuisine. But this Midwestern-born chef cites Jewish food as his culinary roots.

Remembered

In Departures, half-forgotten poet-critic Paul Zweig—who died in 1984 at the age of 49—recalls the decade he spent in Paris on the run from and in search of his Jewish self

Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous

Searching for Jewish cooking in France

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