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How to Say ‘Halloween’ in Yiddish

Rokhl’s Golden City: Yiddish vampires, Jewish Magic, Frankenstein, and ‘all those other impotent gods’

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Can Officially Sanctioned Soviet Yiddish Culture Be Cool? Where Are the Queers? And Other Tablet Soviet Week Questions

Rokhl’s Golden City: Jewish Bolsheviks, Yiddish songs, ‘Comrade Stalin,’ and the year that changed the world

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Caught With My Khalemoyed in My Hand

Rokhl’s Golden City: In the off-days of Sukkot: not going to shul, going out with observant friends to hear an all-female klezmer band, and visiting Eichmann at a museum

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Jerry Lewis Did Kol Nidre in Clown-Face on Yom Kippur, May His Soul Find a Shining Piece of Paradise

Rokhl’s Golden City: The Jazz Singer, and a legendary klezmer drummer bubbe

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Citizens Transformed Into Raging Animals, in Yiddish

Rokhl’s Golden City: New Yiddish Rep’s version of Ionesco’s Rhinoceros, and a trombonist extraordinaire at KlezKanada

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Yiddish on the Beach

Rokhl’s Golden City: A day in Coney Island

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Summer in the Golden City

Rokhl’s Golden City: Get out while you still can. Hit the Yiddish hills, escape into ’80s TV (when Russians were Russians and women wrestled), or just flee to Canada.

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Yiddish Mumblecore

Rokhl’s Golden City: The ethnographic impulse in Joshua Z. Weinstein’s ‘must-see’ film, Menashe

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Is There Light at the End of the Tunnel?

Rokhl’s Golden City: Irving Penn, Florine Stettheimer, the late, great Uriel Weinreich, and the fragile continuity of Yiddish culture

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‘All-of-a-Kind Family,’ Time Travel, and Frozen in Time

Rokhl’s Golden City: What decomposing unearthed silent-film stock has to say to Yiddishists

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Remembering Homework

Rokhl’s Golden City: Bringing Yiddish children to life, while 1970s New York drops dead

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Barney Miller and ‘God of Vengeance’

Rokhl’s Golden City: What 1970s sitcom TV and 1920s Yiddish theater have in common

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Rokhl’s Golden City

Tablet’s new kinda-sorta-weekly column brings you diaspora culture with a Yiddish twist

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