Post-Revolutionary

The Egyptian protests that overthrew Hosni Mubarak failed to change the underlying realities of military domination, entrenched anti-Semitism, and limited foreign policy options

Pact or Fiction

The recent rapprochement between Fatah and Hamas may be a blessing. It exposes the fatal flaw at the heart of the peace process: the West’s fantasy of Palestinian moderation.

Chewing Over Bin Laden

In a Kosher restaurant in Brooklyn, news of Osama Bin Laden’s death prompted inconclusive but spirited talk of President Obama, Israel, Jews, and terrorism

Crack-up

As Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has cracked down on his own people, Washington has turned a blind eye for fear of what new regime might emerge. But it’s impossible for a new leader to be worse.

Certainty Principle

Donald Rumsfeld was discredited when he left the Bush Administration in 2006, but the recent Middle East uprisings might be vindication for both Bush’s Freedom Agenda and the man who helped shape it. The former Defense secretary talks to Tablet Magazine.

Jewel of the Nile

Yussuf al-Qaradawi, the world’s most popular and authoritative Sunni cleric, is a Muslim Brotherhood-aligned Egyptian based in Qatar. A return to his home country would be dangerous for Israel and the West.

Desert Storm

Israeli leaders have long had only one concern when it comes to Egypt: stability, which Hosni Mubarak provided. That’s changing, no matter who ends up in charge.

Borderline

There are several good reasons why Israelis are pulling for the Mubarak regime to hold onto power in Egypt. But maybe they should be embracing change there, instead.

Crisis in Cairo

Mubarak is an autocrat, but he’s also a pro-Israel U.S. ally. As his regime teeters, Tablet turns to experts for perspectives on a rapidly shifting landscape. The latest: foreign policy expert Leslie H. Gelb.

High Morals

A condescending moral double standard allows Western thinkers—notably Times foreign-affairs columnist Roger Cohen—to praise the Middle East’s worst regimes

Twilight

The end of the Cold War, argues French writer Marc Weitzmann, was more significant to U.S. foreign policy than the attacks of Sept. 11

The Arab Lobby

A new book explores the ‘petrodiplomatic complex’ and Saudi influence on U.S. foreign policy

Cinders of Lebanon

The United States abandoned Beirut, and Israel takes the blame

Obama in the Mideast

Part 2 of 2: Ramin Ahmadi, Lokman Slim, Martin Kramer, and Jacob Weisberg consider the president’s policies in the region.

Obama in the Mideast

Part 1 of 2: Elliott Abrams, Robert Malley, Dore Gold, and Andrew Exum consider the president’s policies in the region.

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