What is Tu B’Shevat?
( January 27-28, 2021 | January 16-17, 2022 )

Header

A Centuries-Old Green Delicacy for Tu B’Shevat

A delicious Sephardic dish and a testament to Jewish renewal rescued from the Spanish Middle Ages

Header

A Tu B’Shevat Recipe That Brings the World Together

This quinoa salad combines Andean grains with Asian fruit to make a colorful vegan medley for the holiday

Header

Israel’s Desert Blooms—With Strawberries, Carrots, and Herbs—on The Salad Trail

On an agricultural farm in the Negev, visitors learn how to plant their own vegetable gardens for Tu B’Shevat

Header

How To Make a Salad That Brings Together the Flavors of Ancient Israel

Filled with figs, dates, pomegranates, and olives, it’s perfect for Tu B’Shevat—or any time of year

Header

A Jewish Fig Bread Recipe for Tu B’Shevat

Preserving the ancient holiday tradition of eating dried fruit and preserves

Header

Celebrate Tu B’Shevat With Chocolate Bark

Ring in the new year of the trees, even when it’s the middle of winter

Header

The Modern-day Appeal of Tu B’Shevat

The Jewish New Year of the Trees demands little of us, but offers us a chance to connect our roots with good causes, new rituals, and recipes

Header

In the California Desert, Wilderness Torah Takes Judaism Back to Nature

Founder Zelig Golden, an environmental lawyer turned rabbi-in-training, tries ‘to reconnect the Jewish people’ to the earth

Header

Tu B’Shevat and the ‘Nature’ of Jews

On Tu B’Shevat, Jews celebrate the natural world. Do we praise it for its own sake, or only as a reflection of God?

Header

How to Celebrate the New Year of the Trees

A guide to the Jewish holiday of Tu B’Shevat

Header

Green Day

From composting and juices to photography and Cynthia Ozick, 10 inventive ways to celebrate Tu B’Shevat, the Jewish new year for trees