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Iraqi Stew: Short-Cut Tebit

June 21, 2021
Iraqi Stew: Short-Cut Tebit

Every Jewish community around the world developed its own version of a hot meal that conforms to the prohibition of cooking on the Sabbath: Ashkenazi Jews have cholent, Sephardic Jews have hamin, Central and Western European Jews have shalet, and Iraqi Jews have tebit. The trick for making all these dishes Shabbat-friendly is simple: You bring the pot to a boil on Friday afternoon, in the last minute before the Sabbath rears its holy head, and let it simmer until the next day. All these different versions of Shabbat stews, stemming from each and every corner of the Diaspora, have made it safely to Israel. But these days, the exotic and extremely sticky tebit is more popular than ever—and not only among Iraqi Jews.

Featured in: Best Cholent Ever? An Iraqi Stew

Recipe by: Orly Bronshtein

Ingredients

  • 3tablespoons oil
  • 6chicken drumsticks (with or without the skin)
  • 1chopped onion
  • 2crushed garlic cloves
  • 2cups rice
  • 2tablespoons tomato paste or 2 grated tomatoes
  • ½teaspoon turmeric
  • 2teaspoons Iraqi baharat
  • 1teaspoon paprika
  • 1teaspoon dried nana mint or dried spearmint
  • Salt to taste
  • 3cups hot water
Yield: 4 servings

Preparation

Orly Bronshtein’s recipe for Short-Cut Tebit, from Walla! Food

  • Step 1

    Heat the oil in a wide and short saucepan, and fry the onions and chicken drumsticks for about 8 minutes until golden.

  • Step 2

    Add the garlic and rice. Fry for an additional 3 minutes until the rice is white and not transparent.

  • Step 3

    Add the tomato paste and spices, and fry until golden while stirring.

  • Step 4

    Add the water and boil.

  • Step 5

    After the water is boiling, turn down the heat and cook with the lid on for about 20-30 minutes.

  • Step 6

    If you have time, transfer to a preheated oven (350 degrees Fahrenheit) and bake for an additional 20 minutes without the lid, or for an additional hour with the lid, just to make it extra-crispy.

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