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Supreme Court Justice Arrives Late to Baseball Playoff Because of Yom Kippur

Justice Stephen Breyer answers to a higher authority

by
Yair Rosenberg
October 06, 2014
Rob Carr/Getty Images
Adam LaRoche of the Washington Nationals tags out Brandon Crawford of the San Francisco Giants in the fifth inning of Game Two of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 4, 2014 in Washington, DC. Rob Carr/Getty Images
Rob Carr/Getty Images
Adam LaRoche of the Washington Nationals tags out Brandon Crawford of the San Francisco Giants in the fifth inning of Game Two of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 4, 2014 in Washington, DC. Rob Carr/Getty Images

This past Saturday, baseball fans witnessed the longest playoff game in the sport’s history, when the San Francisco Giants bested the Washington Nationals in 6 hours and 23 minutes, over 18 innings of play. The game took place in the nation’s capital, and consequently had all sorts of notables in attendance, from NBC’s Chuck Todd to House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy. But as the New York Times reports, one distinguished guest showed up noticeably late: Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer. Why? Because he had been observing Yom Kippur.

The Times writes how Breyer, a San Francisco native, toughed out the proceedings in the frigid late-night weather:

Perhaps most impressive was Justice Stephen G. Breyer, 76, who arrived four innings late because of Yom Kippur but refused to leave as the hours dragged on and the ballpark grew cold. While other shivering fans mobbed souvenir shops to buy sweatshirts and other warm gear, Justice Breyer proudly pointed out his excellent preparation: layers of clothes, including a dark green winter jacket and leather gloves.

As it turns out, even Supreme Court justices answer to a higher authority.

Yair Rosenberg is a senior writer at Tablet. Subscribe to his newsletter, listen to his music, and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

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