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Who Downed the Russian Airliner? Israel, Obvi.

One journalist’s conspiracy theory uses ‘triangulation’ and dots the ‘j’ in Metrojet and the ‘i’ in Lord Rothschild, providing the world with the answer we’ve all been hoping for

by
Jonathan Zalman
November 10, 2015
Seliman Al-Oteifi/AFP/Getty Images
Egyptian Prime Minister Sherif Ismail (R) at the site of the wreckage of a crashed A321 Russian airliner in Wadi al-Zolomat in Hassana province, a mountainous area of Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, October 31, 2015. Seliman Al-Oteifi/AFP/Getty Images
Seliman Al-Oteifi/AFP/Getty Images
Egyptian Prime Minister Sherif Ismail (R) at the site of the wreckage of a crashed A321 Russian airliner in Wadi al-Zolomat in Hassana province, a mountainous area of Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, October 31, 2015. Seliman Al-Oteifi/AFP/Getty Images

On October 31, a Russian airliner heading from Egypt to St. Petersburg, Russia, crashed in northern Sinai, killing all 224 people on board, a majority of them Russians. As families grieve, people are searching for answers: What caused the crash? Was it a bomb? If so, who is responsible? Is it ISIS, or one of its affiliates?

No, dummy, it’s probably Israel. At least, that is, according to the math of Pepe Escobar, a reporter for the Asia Times and Russia Today, who outlined his theory on Facebook.

Jonathan Zalman is a writer and teacher based in Brooklyn.

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