Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

Kosher Barbecue Maven Shares His Secret Recipe for the Perfect Dry Rub

Video: This July Fourth, mix up the ideal seasoning for barbecue chicken or brisket—or an unexpected treat for vegetarians

Print Email
Related Content

Southern Comfort

Welcome to Memphis’ World Kosher Barbecue Championship, where thousands of participants get a chance to meld their Southern and Jewish traditions

Chef Ari White learned to slow-smoke meat from his father in the backyard of his childhood home in El Paso, Texas. Today, White operates a kosher catering company in Yonkers, N.Y., and claims to own the only kosher wood-burning barbecue pit in the country. Every weekend this summer, he’ll haul his 18-foot smoking rig to street fairs across the Northeast, serving up pulled brisket, chicken, and turkey drumsticks.

White’s pop-up barbecue stand recently came under fire from some in the Orthodox world: Attendees at a fundraiser for a Philadelphia-area yeshiva complained that the name of his stand—Hakadosh BBQ—was an offensive play on Hakadosh Baruch Hu, a name for God that translates to “The Holy One, Blessed Be He.” White responded with an apology letter in which he said he plans to change the name to Kadosh BBQ, which means Holy Barbecue.

White shared the secret to his ’cue: a 12-spice rub that combines sweet, savory, and spicy flavors and is guaranteed to enhance just about anything you throw on the grill this Independence Day—including an unexpected barbecue treat that even vegetarians can enjoy.

***

Like this article? Sign up for our Daily Digest to get Tablet Magazine’s new content in your inbox each morning.

Print Email

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Kosher Barbecue Maven Shares His Secret Recipe for the Perfect Dry Rub

Video: This July Fourth, mix up the ideal seasoning for barbecue chicken or brisket—or an unexpected treat for vegetarians

More on Tablet:

How Peace Negotiator Martin Indyk Cashed a Big, Fat $14.8 Million Check From Qatar

By Lee Smith — One Middle Eastern nation does indeed pay to influence U.S. foreign policy. Hint: It’s not Israel.