Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Israel’s Central Bank Head to Retire

Stanley Fischer is widely credited with keeping Israel’s economy afloat

Print Email
(Getty)

Stanley Fischer, the Rhodesia-born Israeli economist who was once considered a leading candidate for the post of World Bank President (and IMF Chief, had he been two years younger), is something of a legend in Israel.

Fischer, an internationally respected economist, served as deputy director of the International Monetary Fund and held top posts the World Bank and Citigroup Inc. before taking over Israel’s central bank in 2005.

His monetary policies and Israel’s tight control of its banks are seen responsible for the nation’s stability despite the worldwide economic crisis that hit during his reign. Israel’s economy continues to grow, and unemployment is roughly 6.5 percent, relatively low in world terms.

Well, the reign of Fischer will be coming to an end. It was announced earlier today that Fischer has told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that he’s done at the end of June. Early speculation suggest he’s not resigning for political reasons, but I suppose we’ll know soon enough when he gives a press conference tomorrow. Either way, this is a big deal.

Earlier: Fischer For World Bank President?
Israel Central Bank Chief to Step Down in June
[AP]

Print Email
2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Israel’s Central Bank Head to Retire

Stanley Fischer is widely credited with keeping Israel’s economy afloat

More on Tablet:

How Peace Negotiator Martin Indyk Cashed a Big, Fat $14.8 Million Check From Qatar

By Lee Smith — One Middle Eastern nation does indeed pay to influence U.S. foreign policy. Hint: It’s not Israel.