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Sharansky Defends Women’s Prayer at Kotel

The Jewish Agency chief promises that no arrests will be made

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Natan Sharansky(ReligionandState)

Following an uproar about Jerusalem police commissioner’s threat to arrest women who recite Kaddish at the Western Wall earlier today, Jewish Agency head Natan Sharansky has weighed in.

Sharansky, who is leading a commission to produce recommendations for prayer at the Wall, met with Rabbi Shmuel Rabinowitz (whose organization oversees the Wall) and pledged that female worshipers should not fear arrest.

“The Kotel must continue to be a symbol of unity for all Jews in the world and not a symbol of strife and discord,” Sharansky told Rabinowitz.

Good, so it’s all settled then!

Earlier: Police: Women Can’t Say Kaddish at the Kotel
Western Wall rabbi says women will not be arrested for praying at the Wall
[Haaretz]

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I’m a bit confused by the subtitle “Jewish Agency chief promises that no arrests will be made”

As far as I know, Natan Sharansky has no legal jurisdiction over what happens at the Kotel. How can he “promise” no arrests will be made?

Joel Katz
http://religionandstateinisrael.blogspot.com/

They aren’t saying no arrests will be made. They are saying they won’t arrest women for saying Kaddish. There is no promise about not arresting women for wearing a tallit or anything else.

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Sharansky Defends Women’s Prayer at Kotel

The Jewish Agency chief promises that no arrests will be made

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