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Daybreak: Israelis Uneasy About Haiti Aid

Plus Qaeda in Israel, the tefillin non-bomb, and more in the news

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• Israelis are oddly torn over their military’s heroic efforts in Haiti. The government wants the world to take note; the right wonders why the world doesn’t take note more; the left wonders why Israel doesn’t behave similarly in slightly more proximate (and also catastrophic) Gaza. [NYT]
• Plans for a wall along Israel’s Egyptian border took on new urgency, as military experts warned of the potential for Sudanese to enter the country illegally and establish Qaeda-backed cells. [JPost]
• Even as President Obama admitted to setting Mideast expectations too high, his regional envoy, George Mitchell, relaunched the peace push in talks with Israeli leadership; today, he meets with their Palestinian counterparts. [AP/Haaretz]
• U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon also called for peace talks, and reiterated his opposition to Jewish construction in East Jerusalem. [Haaretz]
• American-Jewish journalist Jared Malsin said he believes his expulsion from Israel was politically motivated. [Ynet]
• Finally, the Times has a nice postmortem on yesterday’s incident in which a flight attendant freaked out over a tefillin-wearing young man and grounded the plane. What sayeth the offending Westchester County 17-year-old’s rabbi? “I would suggest, pray on the plane and put the tefillin on later.” [NYT]

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Daybreak: Israelis Uneasy About Haiti Aid

Plus Qaeda in Israel, the tefillin non-bomb, and more in the news

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