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A Few New Jews

One more rep. and state AG; a GOP rep. closes in

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Georgia Attorney General-elect Sam Olens.(Sam Olens/Flickr)

Immediately after Election Day, it looked like the 112th Congress would contain 12 Jewish senators and 27 congresspersons, including a second Jewish House Republican—Nan Hayworth of New York—to go along with incoming Majority Leader Eric Cantor. [UPDATE: Hayworth is not Jewish, but considers herself an "honorary Jew" because she is married to one.]

But not so fast! Gabrielle Giffords, an incumbent Democratic congresswoman from Arizona, was declared the narrow victor late Friday night; and Randy Altschuler is looking more likely to become the third Jewish Republican congressperson pending the counting of 9,000 absentee ballots in his Long Island district.

And! Georgia just elected its first-ever Jew to a statewide position: Republican Sam Olens will be the Peach State’s attorney general. The best part? He’s from Jersey.

Giffords Ekes Out Victory, Altschuler in Play [JTA]
Ground-Breaking News from Georgia [JustASC]
Earlier: It Happened Last Night

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Curious here…does one simply stating they are Jewish make them a Jew? Scott Hayworth is Jewish, but from my reading Nan Hayworth has NEVER CONVERTED to the religion, was raised Lutheran. Not sure if the Hayworth’s two children are being raised with a Christian faith, or a Jewish faith, but would think you would want to clarify all this?

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A Few New Jews

One more rep. and state AG; a GOP rep. closes in

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