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So Appalled

Comment of the week

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(Ravi Joshi/Tablet Magazine)

Winner gets a free Nextbook Press book that is thematically appropriate to his or her comment (provided he or she emails me with his or her mailing address).

This week’s winner is a the presumably sarcastic commenter “Fuming,” who wrote, on the subject of ever-controversial Mideast columnist Lee Smith’s offering: “I am so ENRAGED at this article I can barely think! It’s racist, offensive, bigoted, racist, and Zionist! My God, Tablet magazine infuriates me with its NEOCON PROPAGANDA OF LEE SMITH! I’m going to fire off an e-mail to Andrew Sullivan and Roger Cohen!”

Since “Fuming” is clearly a pugilist at heart, s/he gets a copy of Douglas Century’s biography of the great Jewish boxer Barney Ross.

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shavit says:

so let me get this straight … a website is rewarding comments that are reactionary, barely thought out, and completely unsupported by critical analysis or evidence?

this is what you want to encourage?

Hell, if i get a free book … I HATE YOU ALL. YOU’RE RACIST, ZIONIST, RACIST, AND STUPID.

(please make the book “exquisite corpse” by Robert Irwin. i lost my copy.)

Marc Tracy says:

I EVEN SAID IT WAS SARCASTIC.

shavit says:

dude … i was joking.

Alana Newhouse says:

Sarchasm (n): the gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn’t get it.

Shavit should get a book.

shavit says:

and which book is that?

Shavit, take your book and . . .

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So Appalled

Comment of the week

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