Tablet Magazine

17 April 2024
9 Nisan 5784

The Scroll

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April 16, 2024

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April 15, 2024

The Scroll

Tablet’s opinionated digest of online news

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Navigate to Bava Metzia 48 podcast page

Take One

Bava Metzia 48

The road to communal hell with Rabbi Dovid Bashevkin

April 16, 2024

Navigate to Let All Who Are Hungry podcast page

Unorthodox

Let All Who Are Hungry

Addressing food insecurity in the lead-up to Passover

April 15, 2024

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Collection
The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action regulating the development of Iran’s nuclear program remains the most consequential and high-stakes piece of foreign policy in the geopolitics of the Middle East, and Tablet has covered the treaty from before its inception under Obama, through the Trump years, and now into Iran Deal 2.0 under the Biden/Blinken Administration.
See the full collection →︎

What Is the Iran Nuclear Deal?

The Iran nuclear agreement, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), is a landmark accord reached between Iran and several world powers, including the United States, in July 2015. Under its terms, Iran agreed to dismantle much of its nuclear program and open its facilities to more extensive international inspections in exchange for billions of dollars’ worth of sanctions relief.

Proponents of the deal said that it would help prevent a revival of Iran’s nuclear weapons program and thereby reduce the prospects for conflict between Iran and its regional rivals, including Israel and Saudi Arabia. However, the deal has been in jeopardy since President Donald Trump withdrew the United States from it in 2018. In retaliation for the U.S. departure and for deadly attacks on prominent Iranians in 2020, including one by the United States, Iran has resumed some of its nuclear activities.

In 2021, President Joe Biden said the United States would return to the deal if Iran came back into compliance. Renewed diplomacy initially seemed promising, but after stop-and-go talks, it remains unclear if the parties can come to an agreement.

Council on Foreign Relations

Iran Deal Archives

Dig into all of our Iran Deal coverage

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