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  • Sunday, November 27 at 8 pm

    The “Khazarian Myth”: The National Identity of the Crimean Karaites with Maksym Martyn

    National Library of Israel

  • Monday, November 28 at 6 pm

    Recovering Memory: Artistic and Artivist Interventions into Historic Silences, from the Archives to the Streets with Zuzanna Hertzberg

    Center for Jewish History

  • Tuesday, November 29 at 7 pm

    I Am Free ... But Who is Left? with Joanne Weiner Rudof and Lawrence L. Langer

    YIVO Institute

Newsletter

Those who do not remember the past are ... probably not Jewish

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a karaite in Cairo

magnes museum


This lamp is brought to the Moussa Dari synagogue that is located on ‘Abbasiya Street, in honor of the holy community of Karaites in Egypt, in honor of the life of Barukh, the fine boy, in the name of the Torah. May God, ruler of Israel, heal him from his illness, dedicated by his father, Ya’aqov son of Barukh of blessed memory. Consecrated on the day of Simchat Torah, in the year 5696 [1935]

-the inscription on the lamp in Hebrew and Arabic that hangs in The Moussa Dari Synagogue. This synagogue was the center of what was once Cairo’s thriving Karaite community.

JFK LIbrary

A detail of a photograph taken in the Oval Office in August 1963 captures Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., John Lewis, President of the American Jewish Congress, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, President of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, Reverend Eugene Carson Blake, President of the Negro American Labor Council, A. Philip Randolph and President Kennedy. Prinz emigrated to the United States from Nazi Germany in 1937 and identified with the fight of African Americans for equal rights and an end to racism. Preceding Martin Luther King Jr. and his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Prinz spoke of his own experience: “A great people, which had created a great civilization, had become a nation of silent onlookers. They remained silent in the face of hate, in the face of brutality and in the face of mass murder. America must not become a nation of onlookers.”

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