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Courtesy Jewish Initiative for Animals
Courtesy Jewish Initiative for Animals
Ethical Kashrut

Jewish institutions go beyond traditional notions of what makes meat kosher to address everything from climate change to animal welfare to workers’ rights

Adrienne Krone began thinking about the entire system of kashrut—Jewish dietary laws—and how to relate ethically to food while researching historical religious diet movements as a Duke University graduate student. Today Krone is assistant professor of religious studies and director of Jewish life at Allegheny College, and her class “Judaism, Justice, and Food” examines the complex justice issues related to food, Jewish biblical dietary laws and rabbinic regulations, and the various aspects of food production. “The kosher system gives you a moment to pause and ask whether it’s something you should be eating. It’s also an opportunity to see how people’s ethics inform their actions,” said Krone. And those ethical issues, she said, arise when discussing agriculture’s role in carbon emissions. Indeed, gas emissions from food production adversely affect climate change, reports the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, meat and dairy account for approximately 14.5% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Increasingly, Jewish institutions are voicing concern and taking action on ethical food practices—beyond traditional notions of kashrut. Citing animal agriculture’s contribution to worker injustice, climate change, and pandemic risk, nearly 200 Jewish clergy and organizational leaders say that kosher certifications, as they currently stand, do not meet Jewish ethical standards. As part of a campaign by the Jewish Initiative for Animals, they are calling for institutions and events to adopt more sustainable food practices out of concern that nearly all kosher animal products, like those that are nonkosher, are produced on factory farms. On factory farms—whether kosher or nonkosher—chickens, cattle, fish, and other animals are confined in tight quarters, and injected with hormones and antibiotics that cause suffering and arrest their natural development. The Sentient Institute, a nonprofit think tank, estimates that 99% of U.S. farmed animals (70.4% of cows, 99.8% of turkeys, 98.2% of chickens raised for eggs, and over 99.9% of chickens raised for meat) live on factory farms, based on U.S. Department of Agriculture data. The Sentient Institute also estimates that, based on the confinement and living conditions of farmed fish, virtually all U.S. fish farms are suitably described as factory farms—though currently there is limited data on fish farm conditions. “You have a responsibility to be aware of any chains of pain that you contribute to,” said David Wolpe, Max Webb Senior Rabbi at Sinai Temple in Los Angeles and one of the JIFA signatories. “I don’t think it is intrinsically wrong to eat animals but I think that the way animals are farmed and killed is appallingly inhumane …You have the choice of the products that you support and the meat that you eat. If you choose to eat meat, don’t deceive yourself that the animal hasn’t suffered to find its way to your plate. It doesn’t matter if it is a free-range chicken—the suffering is enormous and unrelenting. Make an ethically aware choice and do not pretend to sleep.” ...

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100 Foods and Beyond

Check out Tablet’s book The 100 Most Jewish Foods: A Highly Debatable List, and learn the stories behind iconic Jewish dishes. Argue with your friends about what we left out. And if you get hungry, we’ve included 60 recipes, too. And then there’s more...

Play the Jewish Foods Memory Game with your kids. Match up doubles of chicken soup, or borscht, or kreplach, and work up their appetite in the process.

Or try the 500-piece 100 Foods circular puzzle, and set the perfect table filled with your favorite Jewish foods.

Or check out this sticker book, featuring the tastiest items from 100 Most Jewish Foods. Put your favorite stickers on your laptop, your notebook, or your refrigerator.

You can buy all the merchandise, plus The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia, edited by the hosts of Tablet’s Unorthodox podcast, by clicking here.

Getting Warmer

As the weather gets chilly, a chef’s thoughts turn to soup. What better way to warm up on a cold night? Need a recipe? We’ve got you covered. Start with a classic like chicken soup: Joan Nathan’s matzo ball soup—or spice it up with her Yemenite chicken soup. For something entirely different, try Iraqi lamb kubbeh in beet soup, Italian white bean soup, or an Israeli vegetable soup.

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Encyclopedia

Chinese Food

[ʧaɪˈ-niz-fud] noun

“Over the years,” write scholars Gaye Tuchman and Harry G. Levine in their 1992 scholarly paper “New York Jews and Chinese Food: The Social ...

Too Delicious

When people say, ‘Why are Jews not allowed to eat bacon?’ I always say, ‘Too delicious.’ It’s too delicious. At some point, someone said, ‘This is really delicious—no!’

Fran Lebowitz, in ‘Pretend It’s a City,’ now streaming on Netflix

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