Henry S. Dziekan III/Getty Images
Elie Wiesel attends the 3rd Annual Norman Mailer Center Gala on November 8, 2011 in New York City. Henry S. Dziekan III/Getty Images
Navigate to News section

Elie Wiesel Dead at 87

The Holocaust survivor and best-selling author became one of the recognizable Jewish figures of the 20th century and an enduring moral conscience

by
Stephanie Butnick
July 02, 2016
Henry S. Dziekan III/Getty Images
Elie Wiesel attends the 3rd Annual Norman Mailer Center Gala on November 8, 2011 in New York City. Henry S. Dziekan III/Getty Images

Elie Wiesel, the Holocaust survivor and Nobel laureate who became one of the most prominent Jewish figures in the 20th century, died Saturday. He was 87.

Menachem Rosensaft, Wiesel’s longtime friend and colleague, writes in his remembrance of the author and activist, “Not all survivors of the Shoah were able to transcend all they had experienced and witnessed in what Elie Wiesel famously referred to as the ‘Kingdom of Night.’ Suffering, he once observed, ‘gives man no privileges; it all depends on what he does with it. If he uses his suffering against man, he betrays it; if he uses it to fight evil and humanize destiny, then he elevates it and elevates himself.’”

Stephanie Butnick is deputy editor of Tablet Magazine and a host of the Unorthodox podcast.

Thank you for reading Tablet.

The Jewish world needs a place like Tablet where varying—even conflicting—viewpoints can exist side by side. Our times demand an engagement with big ideas and not a retreat from them. Help us do what we do.